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Dry-flowing avalanche run-up and run-out

  • D. M. Mcclung (a1) and A. I. Mears (a2)

Abstract

The prediction of run-up and run-out of dry-flowing avalanches is very important for land-use planning, design of run-out zone defenses and construction of risk maps in avalanche terrain. In this paper, we present a numerical dynamics model to predict the stop position of the tip of these avalanches when friction coefficients (internal and external), initial flow depth and incoming speed are specified for known path geometry in the run-out zone. We also compare our model to that in the Swiss guidelines and to field examples. The results of these calculations clearly define model differences and the implications of different choices of friction coefficients.

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References

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Dry-flowing avalanche run-up and run-out

  • D. M. Mcclung (a1) and A. I. Mears (a2)

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