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        Diluvial-Geologie Und Klima (Klimaheft Der Geologischen Rundschau). (Band 34, Heft 7/8, 1944, p. 307–787. Stuttgart: Ferdinand Enke Verlag. 20 Marks.
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        Diluvial-Geologie Und Klima (Klimaheft Der Geologischen Rundschau). (Band 34, Heft 7/8, 1944, p. 307–787. Stuttgart: Ferdinand Enke Verlag. 20 Marks.
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        Diluvial-Geologie Und Klima (Klimaheft Der Geologischen Rundschau). (Band 34, Heft 7/8, 1944, p. 307–787. Stuttgart: Ferdinand Enke Verlag. 20 Marks.
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This contribution to Pleistocene geology and climate is published by the Geologische Vereinigung of Bonn under a single cover with the above title. The introduction, in effect a survey of knowledge to date, is written by the editor, Professor Carl Troll, whose work is well known in this country.

The rest of the papers are grouped into six sections—a convenient arrangement. It would be impossible in the space available to review each paper individually but as many of the articles in this war-time publication cannot have been available in this country, at least until recently, it is desirable to record them briefly.

Section I on the Ice Age and the pre-glacial period consists of an article by F. Machatschek on the Pleistocene uplift. In Section II (the Pleistocene geology of the Mediterranean area) there are three papers by Max Pfannenstiel, Dimitri Jaranoff and Herbert Louis respectively. Section III dealing with periglacial regions contains papers by Julius Büdel, Albert Steeger and L. Weinberger on the effects of glacial and ice age conditions on ground now free of ice. There is also a paper by Carl Troll on several aspects of cryopedology (Strukturböden, Solifluktion u. Frostklimate der Erde) which has already received notice in this country. Section IV consists of a paper by Leo Aario on the development of vegetation and climate in Finland in late glacial times. Professor R. Finsterwalder deals in Section V with the regime of glaciers.

Section VI contains three papers on the causes of the ice ages, W. Wundt writing on the effect of the earth’s orbit, Wilhelm Meinardus on the principle of radiation and W. Behrmann on pre-glacial climate.

On preceding pages there is a review of three other publications devoted entirely to glaciological subjects—all evidence of the growing importance of these studies as they become redeemed from pure conjecture and approach more nearly the realms of exact science.

G. Seligman