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        Calorimetry
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        Calorimetry
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The Editor,

The Journal of Glaciology

Sir, Calorimetry

I have read with interest the paper by Mr. I. G. Halliday on “The liquid water content of snow” in the March 1950 issue of your journal. It is a very good paper but there are two little mistakes. First, I did not propose “to use a heating coil to bring the calorimeter and melted sample back to the temperature of the original hot water “(page 358, line 10). Secondly, I do not “distrust voltmeters and ammeters for power measurements” (page 360, 12th line from the bottom). Probably these mistakes come from translation which is always very difficult in scientific works.

I am very interested in the private communication from S. Sigurdsson. I should be pleased if you would lend it to me.

Karl Croce

(13b) Inzell, Germany 20 March 1950

[Mr. Halliday writes that he acknowledges Dr. Croce’s first correction, due, as the latter suggests, to a misunderstanding of the German. On the second point Mr. Halliday had based his statement on what he had taken to be Dr. Croce’s preference for the calorimetric method of measuring current.—Ed.]