Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Age–depth correlation, grain growth and dislocation-density evolution, for three ice cores

  • L.W. Morland (a1)

Abstract

Two previous theoretical analyses of data from the GRIP, Vostok and Byrd ice cores, presenting age–depth correlations, grain growth and dislocation-density evolution, are re-examined. It is found that the age–depth correlations are inconsistent with the idealized flow with unchanging history adopted, but that good correlations can be obtained by relaxing those restrictions. A modified grain-growth relation is proposed, consistent with the distinct growth profiles of the Vostok and other two cores, which can be solved simultaneously with the given dislocation-density evolution equation. These are solved for all three cores with the given parameters, and the depth profiles of grain diameter and dislocation density at the present time are determined with the new age–depth correlation and with that shown empirically in the papers. The varying flow history influences the age–depth correlation, and hence the depth profiles, which is important both for the interpretation of core data, and for the determination of constitutive variables at each depth at the present time.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Age–depth correlation, grain growth and dislocation-density evolution, for three ice cores
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Age–depth correlation, grain growth and dislocation-density evolution, for three ice cores
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Age–depth correlation, grain growth and dislocation-density evolution, for three ice cores
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
De La Chapelle, S., Castelnau, O., Lipenkov, V. and Duval, P.. 1998. Dynamic recrystallization and texture development in ice as revealed by the study of deep ice cores in Antarctica and Greenland. J. Geophys. Res., 103(B3), 50915105.
Gao, X.Q. and Jacka, T.H.. 1987. The approach to similar tertiary creep rates for Antarctic core ice and laboratory prepared ice. J. Phys. [Paris], 48(3), Supplément, 289295.(Colloq. C1.)
Gow, A.J. 1969. On the rates of growth of grains and crystals in South Polar firn. J. Glaciol., 8(53), 241252.
Gow, A.J. and Williamson, T.. 1976. Rheological implications of the internal structure and crystal fabrics of the West Antarctic ice sheet as revealed by deep core drilling at Byrd Station. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 87(12), 16651677.
Greve, R. 2001. Glacial isostasy: models for the response of the Earth to varying ice loads. In Straughan, B., Greve, R., Ehrentraut, H. and Wang, Y.,eds. Continuum mechanics and applications in geophysics and the environment. Berlin, etc., Springer-Verlag, 307325.
Jacka, T.H. and Li, J.. 1994. The steady-state crystal size of deforming ice. Ann. Glaciol., 20, 1318.
Lipenkov, V.Ya., Barkov, N.I., Duval, P. and Pimienta, P.. 1989. Crystalline texture of the 2083 m ice core at Vostok Station, Antarctica. J. Glaciol., 35(121), 392398.
Montagnat, M. and Duval, P.. 2000. Rate controlling processes in the creep of polar ice: influence of grain boundary migration associated with recrystallization. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 183(1–2), 179186.
Morland, L.W. 2002. Influence of lattice distortion on fabric evolution in polar ice. Contin. Mech. Thermodyn., 14(1), 924.
Placidi, L., Hutter, K. and Faria, S.H.. 2006. A critical review of the mechanics of polycrystalline ice. GAMM-Mitt., 29(1), 80117.
Staroszczyk, R. and Morland, L.W.. 2001. Strengthening and weakening of induced anisotropy in polar ice. Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A, 457(2014), 24192440.
Stephenson, P.J. 1967. Some considerations of snow metamorphism in the Antarctic ice sheet in the light of ice crystal studies. In Oura, H., ed. Physics of snow and ice. Sapporo, Hokkaido University. Institute of Low Temperature Science, 725740.
Thorsteinsson, T., Kipfstuhl, J. and Miller, H.. 1997. Textures and fabrics in the GRIP ice core. J. Geophys. Res., 102(C12), 26,58326,599.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed