Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-cfpbc Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-22T11:16:07.765Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Preferential accumulation of finite-size particles in near-wall streaks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2024

Cheng Peng*
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture, Ministry of Education, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, PR China
Lian-Ping Wang
Affiliation:
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Turbulence Research and Applications, Center for Complex Flows and Soft Matter Research and Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, PR China Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Joint Laboratory for Data-Driven Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Applications, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, PR China
Songying Chen
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture, Ministry of Education, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, PR China
*
Email address for correspondence: pengcheng@sdu.edu.cn

Abstract

The preference for particles to accumulate at specific regions in the near-wall part is a widely observed phenomenon in wall-bounded turbulence. Unlike small particles more frequently found in low-speed streaks, finite-size particles can accumulate in either low-speed or high-speed streaks. However, mechanisms and influencing factors leading to the different preferential concentration locations still need to be clarified. The present study conducts particle-resolved direct numerical simulations of particle-laden turbulent channel flows to provide a better understanding of this seemingly puzzling behaviour of preferential accumulation. These simulations cover different particle-to-fluid density ratios, particle volume fractions, particle sizes and degrees of sedimentation intensity. We find that the large particle size is the crucial factor that results in particles accumulating in high-speed streaks. Large particles not only are difficult to be conveyed by the quasi-streamwise vortices to low-speed streaks but also can escape from the near-wall region before moving spanwisely out from high-speed streaks. The sedimentation effect allows particles to gather closer to the channel wall and stay longer in the near-wall regions, reinforcing the sweeping mechanism of quasi-streamwise vortices that transport particles from high- to low-speed streaks. As a result, sedimenting particles tend to accumulate in the low-speed streaks.

Type
JFM Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2024. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Berk, T. & Coletti, F. 2023 Dynamics and scaling of particle streaks in high-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layers. J. Fluid Mech. 975, A47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brändle de Motta, J.C., et al. 2019 Assessment of numerical methods for fully resolved simulations of particle-laden turbulent flows. Comput. Fluids 179, 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brenner, H. 1961 The slow motion of a sphere through a viscous fluid towards a plane surface. Chem. Engng Sci. 16 (3–4), 242251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cisse, M., Homann, H. & Bec, J. 2013 Slipping motion of large neutrally buoyant particles in turbulence. J. Fluid Mech. 735, R1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Costa, P., Boersma, B.J., Westerweel, J. & Breugem, W.-P. 2015 Collision model for fully resolved simulations of flows laden with finite-size particles. Phys. Rev. E 92 (5), 053012.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Do-Quang, M., Amberg, G., Brethouwer, G. & Johansson, A.V. 2014 Simulation of finite-size fibers in turbulent channel flows. Phys. Rev. E 89 (1), 013006.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eshghinejadfard, A., Zhao, L. & Thévenin, D. 2018 Lattice Boltzmann simulation of resolved oblate spheroids in wall turbulence. J. Fluid Mech. 849, 510540.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fong, K.O., Amili, O. & Coletti, F. 2019 Velocity and spatial distribution of inertial particles in a turbulent channel flow. J. Fluid Mech. 872, 367406.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gondret, P., Lance, M. & Petit, L. 2002 Bouncing motion of spherical particles in fluids. Phys. Fluids 14 (2), 643652.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ji, C., Munjiza, A., Avital, E., Xu, D. & Williams, J. 2014 Saltation of particles in turbulent channel flow. Phys. Rev. E 89 (5), 052202.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Joseph, G. 2003 Collisional dynamics of macroscopic particles in a viscous fluid. PhD thesis, California Institute of Technology.Google Scholar
Kidanemariam, A.G., Chan-Braun, C., Doychev, T. & Uhlmann, M. 2013 Direct numerical simulation of horizontal open channel flow with finite-size, heavy particles at low solid volume fraction. New J. Phys. 15 (2), 025031.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kim, J., Moin, P. & Moser, R.D. 1987 Turbulence statistics in fully developed channel flow at low Reynolds number. J. Fluid Mech. 177, 133166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lucci, F., Ferrante, A. & Elghobashi, S. 2010 Modulation of isotropic turbulence by particles of Taylor length-scale size. J. Fluid Mech. 650, 555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marchioli, C., Fantoni, M. & Soldati, A. 2010 Orientation, distribution, and deposition of elongated, inertial fibers in turbulent channel flow. Phys. Fluids 22 (3), 033301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marchioli, C. & Soldati, A. 2002 Mechanisms for particle transfer and segregation in a turbulent boundary layer. J. Fluid Mech. 468, 283315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maxey, M.R. 1987 The gravitational settling of aerosol particles in homogeneous turbulence and random flow fields. J. Fluid Mech. 174, 441465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moin, P. & Kim, J. 1982 Numerical investigation of turbulent channel flow. J. Fluid Mech. 118, 341377.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moin, P. & Spalart, P.R. 1987 Contributions of numerical simulation data bases to the physics, modeling and measurement of turbulence. Tech. Rep. NASA-TM-100022.Google Scholar
Naso, A. & Prosperetti, A. 2010 The interaction between a solid particle and a turbulent flow. New J. Phys. 12 (3), 033040.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Niño, Y. & Garcia, M.H. 1996 Experiments on particle–turbulence interactions in the near-wall region of an open channel flow: implications for sediment transport. J. Fluid Mech. 326, 285319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pan, Y. & Banerjee, S. 1996 Numerical simulation of particle interactions with wall turbulence. Phys. Fluids 8 (10), 27332755.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pedinotti, S., Mariotti, G. & Banerjee, S. 1992 Direct numerical simulation of particle behaviour in the wall region of turbulent flows in horizontal channels. Intl J. Multiphase Flow 18 (6), 927941.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peng, C. 2018 Study of turbulence modulation by finite-size solid particles with the lattice Boltzmann method. PhD thesis, University of Delaware.Google Scholar
Peng, C., Ayala, O.M., Brändle de Motta, J.C. & Wang, L.-P. 2019 a A comparative study of immersed boundary method and interpolated bounce-back scheme for no-slip boundary treatment in the lattice Boltzmann method. Part 2. Turbulent flows. Comput. Fluids 192, 104251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peng, C., Ayala, O.M. & Wang, L.-P. 2019 b A direct numerical investigation of two-way interactions in a particle-laden turbulent channel flow. J. Fluid Mech. 875, 10961144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peng, C. & Wang, L.-P. 2019 Direct numerical simulations of turbulent pipe flow laden with finite-size neutrally buoyant particles at low flow Reynolds number. Acta Mechanica 230 (2), 517539.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pestana, T., Uhlmann, M. & Kawahara, G. 2020 Can preferential concentration of finite-size particles in plane Couette turbulence be reproduced with the aid of equilibrium solutions? Phys. Rev. Fluids 5 (3), 034305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Picano, F., Breugem, W.-P. & Brandt, L. 2015 Turbulent channel flow of dense suspensions of neutrally buoyant spheres. J. Fluid Mech. 764, 463487.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rashidi, M., Hetsroni, G. & Banerjee, S. 1990 Particle-turbulence interaction in a boundary layer. Intl J. Multiphase Flow 16 (6), 935949.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reeks, M.W. 1983 The transport of discrete particles in inhomogeneous turbulence. J. Aerosol. Sci. 14 (6), 729739.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rettinger, C. & Rüde, U. 2022 An efficient four-way coupled lattice Boltzmann – discrete element method for fully resolved simulations of particle-laden flows. J. Comput. Phys. 453, 110942.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Saffman, P.G.T. 1965 The lift on a small sphere in a slow shear flow. J. Fluid Mech. 22 (2), 385400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sardina, G., Schlatter, P., Brandt, L., Picano, F. & Casciola, C.M. 2012 Wall accumulation and spatial localization in particle-laden wall flows. J. Fluid Mech. 699, 5078.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shao, X., Wu, T. & Yu, Z. 2012 Fully resolved numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent flow in a horizontal channel at a low Reynolds number. J. Fluid Mech. 693, 319344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, C.R. & Metzler, S.P. 1983 The characteristics of low-speed streaks in the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. J. Fluid Mech. 129, 2754.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Squires, K.D. & Eaton, J.K. 1990 Particle response and turbulence modification in isotropic turbulence. Phys. Fluids A 2 (7), 11911203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Suzuki, Y., Ikenoya, M. & Kasagi, N. 2000 Simultaneous measurement of fluid and dispersed phases in a particle-laden turbulent channel flow with the aid of 3-D PTV. Exp. Fluids 29 (Suppl 1), S185S193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Voth, G.A. & Soldati, A. 2017 Anisotropic particles in turbulence. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 49, 249276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, L.-P. & Maxey, M.R. 1993 Settling velocity and concentration distribution of heavy particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. J. Fluid Mech. 256, 2768.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, L.-P., Peng, C., Guo, Z. & Yu, Z. 2016 Flow modulation by finite-size neutrally buoyant particles in a turbulent channel flow. J. Fluids Engng 138 (4), 041306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xia, Y., Lin, Z., Pan, D. & Yu, Z. 2021 Turbulence modulation by finite-size heavy particles in a downward turbulent channel flow. Phys. Fluids 33 (6), 063321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xia, Y., Xiong, H., Yu, Z. & Zhu, C. 2020 Effects of the collision model in interface-resolved simulations of particle-laden turbulent channel flows. Phys. Fluids 32 (10), 103303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yang, B., Peng, C., Wang, G. & Wang, L.-P. 2021 A direct numerical simulation study of flow modulation and turbulent sedimentation in particle-laden downward channel flows. Phys. Fluids 33 (9), 093306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yousefi, A., Costa, P. & Brandt, L. 2020 Single sediment dynamics in turbulent flow over a porous bed–insights from interface-resolved simulations. J. Fluid Mech. 893, A24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhu, C., Yu, Z., Pan, D. & Shao, X. 2020 Interface-resolved direct numerical simulations of the interactions between spheroidal particles and upward vertical turbulent channel flows. J. Fluid Mech. 891, A6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Peng et al. supplementary movie 1

Evolution of particle locations in the near-wall region for Case B0
Download Peng et al. supplementary movie 1(File)
File 6.2 MB
Supplementary material: File

Peng et al. supplementary movie 2

Evolution of particle locations in the near-wall region for Case B2-R
Download Peng et al. supplementary movie 2(File)
File 5.6 MB
Supplementary material: File

Peng et al. supplementary movie 3

Evolution of particle locations in the near-wall region for Case B1-R-S
Download Peng et al. supplementary movie 3(File)
File 26.6 MB
Supplementary material: File

Peng et al. supplementary material 4

Peng et al. supplementary material
Download Peng et al. supplementary material 4(File)
File 714.2 KB