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On the second-order temperature jump coefficient of a dilute gas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 July 2012

Gregg A. Radtke
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
N. G. Hadjiconstantinou
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
S. Takata
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
K. Aoki
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We use LVDSMC (low-variance deviational Monte Carlo) simulations to calculate, under linearized conditions, the second-order temperature jump coefficient for a dilute gas whose temperature is governed by the Poisson equation with a constant forcing term, as in the case of homogeneous volumetric heating. Both the hard-sphere gas and the BGK model of the Boltzmann equation, for which slip/jump coefficients are not functions of temperature, are considered. The temperature jump relation and jump coefficient determined here are closely linked to the general jump relations for time-dependent problems that have yet to be systematically treated in the literature; as a result, they are different from those corresponding to the well-known linear and steady case where the temperature is governed by the homogeneous heat conduction (Laplace) equation.

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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