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On the formation of sediment chains in an oscillatory boundary layer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 January 2016

Marco Mazzuoli
Affiliation:
Department of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Genoa, Via Montallegro 1, 16145 Genova, Italy Institute for Hydromechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
Aman G. Kidanemariam
Affiliation:
Institute for Hydromechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
Paolo Blondeaux
Affiliation:
Department of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Genoa, Via Montallegro 1, 16145 Genova, Italy
Giovanna Vittori
Affiliation:
Department of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Genoa, Via Montallegro 1, 16145 Genova, Italy
Markus Uhlmann
Affiliation:
Institute for Hydromechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The dynamics of spherical particles resting on a horizontal wall and set into motion by an oscillatory flow is investigated by means of a fully coupled model. Both a smooth wall and a rough wall, the latter being composed of resting particles with a random arrangement and with the same diameter as the moving particles, are considered. The fluid and particle motions are determined by means of direct numerical simulations of Navier–Stokes equations and Newton’s laws, respectively. The immersed boundary approach is used to force the no-slip condition on the surface of the particles. In particular, the process of formation of transverse sediment chains, within the boundary layer but orthogonal to the direction of fluid oscillations, is simulated in parameter ranges matching those of laboratory experiments investigating rolling-grain ripple formation. The numerical results agree with the experimental observations and show that the transverse sediment chains are generated by steady recirculating cells, generated by the interaction of the fluid and particle oscillations.

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Papers
Copyright
© 2016 Cambridge University Press 

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Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 2 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the particles lying on a smooth bottom and initially aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 1.

Video 5 MB

Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 2 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the particles lying on a smooth bottom and initially aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 2.

Video 10 MB

Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 2 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the particles lying on a smooth bottom and initially aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 3.

Video 10 MB

Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 2 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the particles lying on a smooth bottom and initially aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 4.

Video 10 MB

Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 2 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the particles lying on a smooth bottom and initially aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 5.

Video 5 MB

Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 6 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the movable particles (coloured spheres) lying on a layer of resting particles (black spheres) and initially arranged in six rows aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 1.

Video 10 MB

Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 6 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the movable particles (coloured spheres) lying on a layer of resting particles (black spheres) and initially arranged in six rows aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 2.

Video 10 MB

Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 6 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the movable particles (coloured spheres) lying on a layer of resting particles (black spheres) and initially arranged in six rows aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 3.

Video 10 MB

Mazzuoli et al. supplemetary movie

Movie of run nr. 6 (R_{\delta}=26.3, s=2.65, d=0.53, R_p=11.4). Top view of the position of the movable particles (coloured spheres) lying on a layer of resting particles (black spheres) and initially arranged in six rows aligned along the direction of fluid motion. Part 4.

Video 6 MB

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