Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-77ffc5d9c7-866w8 Total loading time: 0.309 Render date: 2021-04-23T06:25:44.939Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Controlled oscillations of a cylinder: forces and wake modes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2005

J. CARBERRY
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Monash University 3800, Australia
J. SHERIDAN
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Monash University 3800, Australia
D. ROCKWELL
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA

Abstract

The wake states from a circular cylinder undergoing controlled sinusoidal oscillation transverse to the free stream are examined. As the frequency of oscillation passes through the natural Kármán frequency there is a transition between two distinctly different wake states: the low- and high-frequency states. The transition corresponds to a change in the structure of the near wake and is also characterized by a jump in the phase and amplitude of both the total and vortex lift. Over the range of flow and oscillation parameters studied the wake states exhibit a number of universal features. The phases of the vortex lift and drag forces have characteristic values for the low- and high-frequency states, which appear to be directly related to the phase of vortex shedding. A split force concept is employed, whereby instantaneous force traces and images allow discrimination between the actual loading and the physics, and their conventional time-averaged representations. The wake states for the forced oscillations show some remarkable similarities to the response branches of elastically mounted cylinders. The equivalence between forced and self-excited oscillations is addressed in detail using concepts of energy transfer.

Type
Papers
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 277 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Controlled oscillations of a cylinder: forces and wake modes
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Controlled oscillations of a cylinder: forces and wake modes
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Controlled oscillations of a cylinder: forces and wake modes
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *