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DOHaD in Indigenous populations: DOHaD, epigenetics, equity and race

  • G. Singh (a1), J. Morrison (a2) and W. Hoy (a3)
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References

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2. Gluckman, PD, Hanson, MA, Low, FM. The role of developmental plasticity and epigenetics in human health. Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today. 2011; 93, 1218.
3. Barouki, R, Gluckman, PD, Grandjean, P, Hanson, M, Heindel, JJ. Developmental origins of non-communicable disease: implications for research and public health. Environ Health. 2012; 11, 42.
4. McMillen, IC, Robinson, JS. Developmental origins of the metabolic syndrome: prediction, plasticity, and programming. Physiol Rev. 2005; 85, 571633.
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6. Bianco-Miotto, T, Craig, JM, Gasser, YP, van Dijk, SJ, Ozanne, SE. Epigenetics and DOHaD: from basics to birth and beyond. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2017; 8, 513519.
7. Wallack, L, Thornburg, K. Developmental origins, epigenetics, and equity: moving upstream. Matern Child Health J. 2016; 20, 935940.
8. Barker, DJP. Developmental origins of chronic disease. Public Health. 2012; 126, 185189.
9. Brenner, BM1, Garcia, DL, Anderson, S. Glomeruli and blood pressure. Less of one, more the other? Am J Hypertens. 1988; 1(4 Pt 1), 335347.
10. McEwen, E, Boulton, T, Smith, R. Can the gap in Aboriginal childhood outcomes be explained by the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis a narrative review of the literature. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019; 10, xxxx.
11. Salmon, M, Skelton, F, Thurber, K, et al. Intergenerational and early life influences on the wellbeing of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children: overview and selected findings from footprints in time, the longitudinal study of Indigenous children. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019; 10, xxxx.
12. Jabar, F, Colatruglio, S, Sellers, E, Wicklow, B. The next generation cohort: a description of a cohort at high risk for childhood onset type 2 diabetes. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019; 10, xxxx.
13. Mah, BL, Pringle, KG, Weatherall, L, et al. Pregnancy stress, healthy pregnancy and birth outcomes- the need for early preventative approaches in pregnant Australian Indigenous women: a prospective longitudinal cohort study. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019; 10, xxxx.
14. Lee, YQ, Pringle, K, Rae, K, et al. Influence of maternal adiposity, preterm birth and birth weight centiles on early childhood obesity in an Indigenous Australian pregnancy-through-to-early-childhood cohort study. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019; 10, xxxx.
15. Dyck, R, Karunanayake, C, Pahwa, P, Osgood, N. The hefty fetal phenotype hypothesis revisited: high birth weight, type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes in a Saskatchewan cohort of First Nations and non-First Nations women. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019; 10, xxxx.
16. Hoy, W, Nicol, J. The Barker hypothesis confirmed: association of low birthweight and all-cause natural deaths in young adult life in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019; 10, xxxx.

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