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Prenatal hypoxia increases blood pressure in male rat offspring and affects their response to artificial light at night

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2020

Hana Sutovska
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
Lubos Molcan
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
Romana Koprdova
Affiliation:
Centre of Experimental Medicine SAS, Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia
Michaela Piesova
Affiliation:
Centre of Experimental Medicine SAS, Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia Department of Pharmacology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Martin, Slovakia
Mojmír Mach
Affiliation:
Centre of Experimental Medicine SAS, Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia
Michal Zeman
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Prenatal hypoxia (PH) has negative consequences on the cardiovascular system in adulthood and can affect the responses to additional insults later in life. We explored the effects of PH imposed during embryonic day 20 (10.5% O2 for 12 h) on circadian rhythms of systolic blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in mature male rat offspring measured by telemetry. We evaluated: (1) stability of BP and HR changes after PH; (2) circadian variability of BP and HR after 2 and 5 weeks of exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN; 1–2 lx); and (3) response of BP and HR to norepinephrine. PH increased BP in the dark (134 ± 2 mmHg vs. control 127 ± 2 mmHg; p = 0.05) and marginally in the light (125 ± 1 mmHg vs. control 120 ± 2 mmHg) phase of the day but not HR. The effect of PH was highly repeatable between 21- and 27-week-old PH male offspring. Two weeks of ALAN decreased the circadian variability of HR (p < 0.05) and BP more in control than PH rats. After 5 weeks of ALAN, the circadian variability of HR and BP were damped compared to LD and did not differ between control and PH rats (p < 0.05). Responses of BP and HR to norepinephrine did not differ between control and PH rats. Hypoxia at the end of the embryonic period increases BP and affects the functioning of the cardiovascular system in mature male offspring. ALAN in adulthood decreased the circadian variability of cardiovascular parameters, more in control than PH rats.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press in association with International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

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