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Impact of in vitro embryo culture and transfer on blood pressure regulation in the adolescent lamb

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 November 2020

Monalisa Padhee
Affiliation:
Early Origins of Adult Health Research Group, Health and Biomedical Innovation, UniSA: Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
I. Caroline McMillen
Affiliation:
Early Origins of Adult Health Research Group, Health and Biomedical Innovation, UniSA: Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Song Zhang
Affiliation:
Early Origins of Adult Health Research Group, Health and Biomedical Innovation, UniSA: Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Severence M. MacLaughlin
Affiliation:
Early Origins of Adult Health Research Group, Health and Biomedical Innovation, UniSA: Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
James A. Armitage
Affiliation:
School of Medicine (Optometry), Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, Australia
Geoffrey A. Head
Affiliation:
Neuropharmacology Lab, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Jack R. T. Darby
Affiliation:
Early Origins of Adult Health Research Group, Health and Biomedical Innovation, UniSA: Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Jennifer M. Kelly
Affiliation:
South Australian Research and Development Institute, Turretfield, South Australia, Australia
Skye R. Rudiger
Affiliation:
South Australian Research and Development Institute, Turretfield, South Australia, Australia
David O. Kleemann
Affiliation:
South Australian Research and Development Institute, Turretfield, South Australia, Australia
Simon K. Walker
Affiliation:
South Australian Research and Development Institute, Turretfield, South Australia, Australia
Janna L. Morrison*
Affiliation:
Early Origins of Adult Health Research Group, Health and Biomedical Innovation, UniSA: Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
*
Address for correspondence: Janna L. Morrison, Australian Research Council Future Fellow (Level 3), Early Origins of Adult Health Research Group, Health and Biomedical Innovation, UniSA: Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia. Email: Janna. Morrison@unisa.edu.au

Abstract

Nutrition during the periconceptional period influences postnatal cardiovascular health. We determined whether in vitro embryo culture and transfer, which are manipulations of the nutritional environment during the periconceptional period, dysregulate postnatal blood pressure and blood pressure regulatory mechanisms. Embryos were either transferred to an intermediate recipient ewe (ET) or cultured in vitro in the absence (IVC) or presence of human serum (IVCHS) and a methyl donor (IVCHS+M) for 6 days. Basal blood pressure was recorded at 19–20 weeks after birth. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured before and after varying doses of phenylephrine (PE). mRNA expression of signaling molecules involved in blood pressure regulation was measured in the renal artery. Basal MAP did not differ between groups. Baroreflex sensitivity, set point, and upper plateau were also maintained in all groups after PE stimulation. Adrenergic receptors alpha-1A (αAR1A), alpha-1B (αAR1B), and angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) mRNA expression were not different from controls in the renal artery. These results suggest there is no programmed effect of ET or IVC on basal blood pressure or the baroreflex control mechanisms in adolescence, but future studies are required to determine the impact of ET and IVC on these mechanisms later in the life course when developmental programming effects may be unmasked by age.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press in association with International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

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