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Risk factors for isolation of Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus dysgalactiae from milk culture obtained approximately 6 days post calving

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2008

Olav Østerås
Affiliation:
Department of Production Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo, Norway Department of Norwegian Cattle Health Services, TINE Norwegian Dairies, PO Box 58, 1431 Ås, Norway
Anne Cathrine Whist
Affiliation:
Department of Production Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo, Norway Department of Norwegian Cattle Health Services, TINE Norwegian Dairies, PO Box 58, 1431 Ås, Norway
Liv Sølverød
Affiliation:
Department of Norwegian Cattle Health Services, TINE Norwegian Dairies, PO Box 58, 1431 Ås, Norway Mastitis Laboratory, TINE Norwegian Dairies, Fannestrandvegen 55, 6415 Molde, Norway
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Milk culture results at approximately 6 d post calving were assessed in a 2-year retrospective single-cohort study in 178 Norwegian herds. A combined teat dipping and selective antibiotic therapy trial was performed in these herds where cows with composite milk somatic cell count (CMSCC) >100 000 cells/ml before drying-off (geometric mean of the last three CMSCC test-days) and isolation of Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus dysgalactiae were selected for either short-acting lactation antibiotic treatment or long-acting dry cow antibiotic treatment. Milk culture results at approximately 6 d post-calving were available from 437 treated cows and 3061 non-treated cows before drying-off and separate multivariable logistic regression models were ran for these two groups. Risk factors associated with isolation of Staph. aureus 6 d post calving for non-treated cows were CMSCC >400 000 cells/ml before drying-off v. <400 000 cells/ml (Odds ratio (OR)=2·4) and clinical mastitis (CM) in the previous lactation v. non-treated (OR=1·5). Risk factors associated with Staph. aureus 6 d post calving for treated cows was a CMSCC >200 000 cells/ml before drying-off v. <200 000 cells/ml (OR=2·3) and CM in the previous lactation versus non-treated (OR=1·7). For non-treated cows it was 1·7-times more likely to isolate Str. dysgalactiae 6 d post-calving if the CMSCC was >50 000 cells/ml compared with <50 000 cells/ml. For treated cows it was 3·7–5·8-times more likely to isolate Str. dysgalactiae 6 d post calving if given short-acting lactation formula at quarter level compared with long-acting dry cow formula used at cow level. Regular use of iodine post-milking teat disinfection (PMTD) did not influence the isolation of Staph. aureus 6 d post calving, but it was less likely to isolate Str. dysgalactiae 6 d post calving if iodine PMTD was used regularly rather than irregularly. The external teat sealant had no effect on either of the two bacteria.

This study indicates that the CMSCC limit for sampling cows before drying-off can be reduced to 50 000 cells/ml in herds with a Str. dysgalactiae problem. Iodine PMTD should also be recommended in these herds. Cows with a CMSCC >400 000 cells/ml prior to drying-off should receive long-acting dry cow formula irrespective of the milk culture result.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2008

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References

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