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Repression of Pseudomonas fluorescens extracellular lipase secretion by arginine

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

Leonides Fernandez
Affiliation:
Departamento de Tecnologia y Bioquimica de los Alimentos, Facultad de Veterinaria, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040-Madrid, Spain
Carmen San Jose
Affiliation:
Departamento de Tecnologia y Bioquimica de los Alimentos, Facultad de Veterinaria, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040-Madrid, Spain
Robin C. McKellar
Affiliation:
Food Research Centre, Research Branch, Agriculture Canada, Ottawa KlA 0C6, Canada

Summary

The effect of arginine on the production of extracellular lipase by Pseudomonas fluorescens 32A was studied. Arginine repressed lipase production when N was supplied partially or totally as arginine. Proteinase production was unaffected under the same conditions. Arginine did not repress lipase secretion when cells were pregrown in an arginine-containing medium; however, repression was found with uninduced cells. Several arginine-analogues were tested for the ability to repress lipase secretion and. of these, L-homoarginine and L-canavanine were the most effective. D-Arginine, L-arginine methyl ester, and L-ornithine did not cause repression. With the exception of glutamic acid and methionine, those amino acids that supplied N but not C for growth were found to repress lipase secretion. It is suggested that the accumulation of metabolic intermediate(s) may cause repression of lipase production.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1990

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