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Regional accretion of gelatinase B in mammary gland during gradual and acute involution of dairy animals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2008

Ming H Weng
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung402, TaiwanROC
Ting C Yu
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung402, TaiwanROC
Shuen E Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung402, TaiwanROC
Ho C Peh
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung402, TaiwanROC
Wen B Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung402, TaiwanROC
Ming T Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Bioindustry Technology, Da Yeh University, Chung Hwa515, TaiwanROC
Hajemi Nagahata
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido069-8501, Japan
Chai J Chang
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung402, TaiwanROC
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The level of gelatinases in surrounding body fluids of actively remodelling tissue is indicative of basement membrane and extracellular matrix degradation under various physiological and pathological circumstances. To elucidate the association of gelatinase with mammary tissue remodelling during gradual or acute involution, in the first trial, goats milked twice daily (lactation) and goats receiving decreased milking frequency (involution) served to provide a total of 12 milk samples and 11 mammary secretion samples, respectively. In the second trial, 6 cows served to provide samples of dry secretion in 3 consecutive weeks immediately following milk stasis. Gelatin zymography was applied for gelatinase phenotyping and quantification on milk, plasma and the degranulation medium/lysate of milk somatic cells. Results indicated that the most prevalent gelatinase subtype switched from gelatinase A in milk to gelatinase B in involution secretion. Mammary secretion of goats during involution contained marginally higher protein level, significantly lower casein ratio and greater specific capacity of gelatinase B compared with those of milk during lactation. Specific capacities of gelatinases A and B in plasma of goats were similar during lactation and involution, while gelatinase B capacity in degranulation medium/lysates based on unit number of goat somatic cell was significantly higher during involution than during lactation. Milk stasis of cows induced a significant increase in specific capacity of gelatinase B, but not gelatinase A, of dry secretion up to the third week. Results of both trials agree that regional selective accretion of gelatinase B in milk might have played a role in mammary tissue remodelling during involution induced by either decreasing milking frequency or milk stasis. It is suggested that infiltrated polymorphonuclear neutrophils are one of the potential contributors responsible for the accumulation of gelatinase B during involution.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2008

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