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Non-invasive detection of fatty liver in dairy cows by digital analyses of hepatic ultrasonograms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2008

Gerd Bobe
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011, USA
Viren R Amin
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011, USA
Arnold R Hippen
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011, USA
Pengxiang She
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011, USA
Jerry W Young
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011, USA
Donald C Beitz
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

During early lactation, many dairy cows develop fatty liver, which is associated with decreased health and reproductive performance. Currently, fatty liver can be detected reliably only by using liver biopsy followed by chemical or histological analysis, which is not practical in most on-farm situations. We tested whether digital analyses of hepatic ultrasonograms can be used to detect non-invasively fatty liver and estimate liver triacylglycerol content. A total of 49 liver biopsies and ultrasonograms were taken from 29 dairy cows within 2 weeks postpartum. The usefulness of 17 first- or second-order parameters from digital analysis of B-mode ultrasonograms were evaluated by discriminant, correlation, and regression analyses. A group of linear combinations of the 17 parameters correctly classified 40 of 49 samples into normal liver as well as mild, moderate and severe fatty liver when cut-off values were 1%, 5% and 10% and correctly classified 45 of 49 samples when cut-off values were 5% and 10% triacylglycerol of wet weight. A linear combination of 16 image parameters estimated triacylglycerol concentrations of 38 of the 39 liver samples below the cut-off value of 10% within 2·5% of liver wet weight, and a linear combination of 3 parameters estimated triacylglycerol concentrations of the 10 liver samples above the cut-off value of 10% within 2% of liver wet weight. Therefore, ultrasound imaging followed by digital analysis of sonograms has potential to non-invasively detect fatty liver and estimate liver triacylglycerol content.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2008

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Non-invasive detection of fatty liver in dairy cows by digital analyses of hepatic ultrasonograms
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