Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-z4vvc Total loading time: 0.319 Render date: 2021-03-02T15:05:49.081Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Mineral and casein equilibria in milk: effects of added salts and calcium-chelating agents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2000

PUNSANDANI UDABAGE
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia
IAN R. McKINNON
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia
MARY-ANN AUGUSTIN
Affiliation:
Food Science Australia, Private Bag 16, Sneydes Road, Werribee, VIC 3030, Australia

Abstract

We have investigated the effects of adding a range of mineral salts and calcium-chelating agents on the distribution of casein and minerals between the non-pelleted and pelleted phases of milk obtained upon centrifugation at 78000 g for 90 min. Adding CaCl2 or mixtures of NaH2PO% and Na2HPO% to reconstituted skim milk (90 g milk solids/kg) at pH 6·65 increased both pelleted casein and pelleted calcium phosphate. Opposite effects were obtained by adding citrate or EDTA. The change in pelleted calcium phosphate was not simply related to casein release from the micelle. Upon adding 5 mmol EDTA/kg milk, 20% of the pelleted Ca, 22% of the pelleted phosphate and 5% of the micellar casein were removed. Increasing the concentration of EDTA to 10 mmol/kg milk decreased the pelleted Ca by 44% and the pelleted phosphate by 46%, and caused 30%of the micellar casein to be released. The effects of adding phosphate, citrate or EDTA at pH 6·65, followed by the addition of CaCl2, demonstrated the reversibility of the dissolution and formation of the micellar calcium phosphate. There were limits to this reversibility that were related to the amount of colloidal calcium phosphate removed from the casein micelles. Adding CaCl2 to milk containing [ges ] 20 mmol EDTA or [ges ] 30 mmol citrate/kg milk did not result in complete reformation of casein micelles. Light-scattering experiments confirmed that the dissolution of moderate amounts of colloidal calcium phosphate had little effect on micellar size and were reversible, while the dissolution of larger amounts of colloidal calcium phosphate resulted in large reductions in micellar size and was irreversible.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 504 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 2nd March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Mineral and casein equilibria in milk: effects of added salts and calcium-chelating agents
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Mineral and casein equilibria in milk: effects of added salts and calcium-chelating agents
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Mineral and casein equilibria in milk: effects of added salts and calcium-chelating agents
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *