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Influence of oestrus on the heat stability and other characteristics of milk from dairy goats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2008

Georgios Christodoulopoulos
Affiliation:
Clinic of Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Thessaly, Karditsa GR-43100, Greece
Nikolaos Solomakos
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Hygiene of Animal Origin Foods, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Thessaly, Karditsa GR-43100, Greece
Panagiotis D Katsoulos
Affiliation:
Clinic of Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Thessaly, Karditsa GR-43100, Greece
Anastasios Minas
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Microbiology, Faculty of Health Professions, Technological Educational Institution of Larissa, Larissa GR-41222, Greece
Spyridon K Kritas
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124, Macedonia, Greece
Corresponding
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Abstract

We examined the heat stability, somatic cell count (SCC), pH, fat, protein and lactose content of milk from goats during the oestrous period, in order to investigate evidence of possible oestrus effects on milk physical and chemical properties. Goats free from mammary infections were ranked on average SCC from three tests so that they could be stratified randomly in pairs to synchronized oestrus or left as unsynchronized non-oestrus controls. The synchronisation consisted of insertion of an intravaginal progesterone-releasing device for 17 d, and introduction of the bucks the day of the device removal (D0). The repeated measurements analysis of variance model included the fixed effects of the experimental group (oestrus or control) and day and the corresponding interaction and also the random effect of doe. Reduced milk-heat stability, increased SCC, increased protein content and reduced pH were found in the milk samples of the oestrus group on D1, 2 and 3. The fat and lactose content of the milk was not affected by oestrus. These data indicate that the milk of goats during the mating period has reduced heat stability and, therefore, that dilution into bulk tanks should be recommended to avoid clotting when milk is intended for high thermal treatment.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2008

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