Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-55wx7 Total loading time: 0.622 Render date: 2021-03-07T03:52:50.298Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Influence of fat replacers on chemical composition, proteolysis, texture profiles, meltability and sensory properties of low-fat Kashar cheese

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2007

Nuray Sahan
Affiliation:
Department of Food Engineering, Agricultural Faculty, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana, Turkey
Kurban Yasar
Affiliation:
Department of Food Engineering, Engineering-Architecture Faculty, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17100 Canakkale, Turkey
Ali A Hayaloglu
Affiliation:
Department of Food Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Inonu University, 44280 Malatya, Turkey
Oya B Karaca
Affiliation:
Department of Food Engineering, Agricultural Faculty, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana, Turkey
Ahmet Kaya
Affiliation:
Department of Food Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Gaziantep University, 27310 Gaziantep, Turkey
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Changes in chemical composition, proteolysis, lipolysis, texture, melting and sensory properties of low-fat Kashar cheese made with three different fat replacers (Simplesse® D-100, Avicel Plus® CM 2159 or β-glucan) were investigated throughout ripening. The low-fat cheeses made with fat replacers were compared with full- and low-fat counterparts as controls. Reduction of fat caused increases in moisture and protein contents and decreases in moisture-in-non fat substance and yield values in low-fat cheeses. The use of fat replacers in the manufacture of low-fat Kashar cheese increased water binding capacity and improved overall quality of the cheeses. Use of fat replacer in low-fat cheese making has enhanced cheese proteolysis. All samples underwent lipolysis during ripening and low-fat cheeses with fat replacers had higher level of total free fatty acid than full- or low-fat control cheeses. Texture attributes and meltability significantly increased with addition of fat replacers. Sensory scores showed that the full-fat cheese was awarded best in all stages of ripening and low-fat variant of Kashar cheeses have inferior quality. However, fat replacers except β-glucan improved the appearance, texture and flavour attributes of low-fat cheeses. When the fat replacers are compared, the low-fat cheese with Avicel Plus® CM 2159 was highly acceptable and had sensory attributes closest to full-fat Kashar cheese.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bryant, A, Ustunol, Z & Steffe, J 1995 Texture of Cheddar cheese as influenced by fat reduction. Journal of Food Science 60 12161219CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drake, MA & Swanson, BG 1995 Reduced and low-fat cheese technology. A review. Trends in Food Science and Technology 6 366369CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drake, MA, Boylston, TD & Swanson, BG 1996 Fat mimetics in low-fat Cheddar cheese. Journal of Food Science 61 12671270CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fenelon, MA & Guinee, TP 1997 The compositional, textural and maturation characteristics of reduced-fat Cheddar made from milk containing added Dairy Lo™. Milchwissenschaft 52 385389Google Scholar
Fenelon, MA & Guinee, TP 2000 Primary proteolysis and textural changes during ripening in Cheddar cheeses manufactured to different fat contents. International Dairy Journal 10 151158CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fife, RL, McMahon, DJ & Oberg, CJ 1996 Functionality of low-fat Mozzarella cheese. Journal of Dairy Science 79 19031910CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fox, PF, Guinee, TP, Cogan, TM & McSweeney, PLH 2000 Fundamentals of Cheese Sciences. Gaithershurg, Maryland: Aspen PublicationGoogle Scholar
Hayaloglu, AA, Guven, M, Fox, PF & McSweeney, PLH 2005 Influence of starters on chemical, biochemical, and sensory changes in Turkish White-brined cheese during ripening. Journal of Dairy Science 88 34603474CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kahyaoglu, T, Kaya, S & Kaya, A 2005 Effect of fat reduction and curd dipping temperature on viscoelasticity, texture and appearance of Gaziantep cheese. Food Science and Technology International 11 191198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Katsiari, MC & Voutsinas, LP 1994 Manufacture of low-fat Feta cheese. Food Chemistry 32 5360CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kavas, G, Oysun, G, Kinik, O & Uysal, H 2004 Effect of some fat replacers on chemical, physical and sensory attributes of low-fat white pickled cheese. Food Chemistry 86 381388CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koca, N & Metin, M 2004 Textural, melting and sensory properties of low-fat fresh Kashar cheeses produced by using fat replacers. International Dairy Journal 14 365373CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Konuklar, G, Inglett, GE, Felker, FC & Carriere, CJ 2004 Use of β-glucan hydrocolloidal suspension in the manufacture of low-fat Cheddar cheese: textural properties by instrumental methods and sensory panels. Food Hydrocolloids 18 535545CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lawrence, RC, Creamer, LK & Gilles, J 1987 Texture development during cheese ripening. Journal of Dairy Science 70 17481760CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McMahon, DJ, Alleyne, MC, Fife, RL & Oberg, CJ 1996 Use of fat replacers in low fat Mozzarella cheese. Journal of Dairy Science 79 19111921CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mistry, VV 2001 Low-fat cheese technology. International Dairy Journal 11 413422CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pavia, M, Trujillo, AJ, Guamis, B & Ferragut, V 2000 Proteolysis in Manchego-type cheese salted by brine vacuum impregnation. Journal of Dairy Science 83 14411447CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Poduval, VS & Mistry, VV 1999 Manufacture of Reduced fat Mozzarella cheese using ultrafiltrated sweet buttermilk and homogenized cream. Journal Dairy Science 82 19CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rodriguez, J 1998 Recent advances in the development of low-fat cheeses. Trends in Food Science and Technology 9 249254CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Romeih, EA, Michaelidou, A, Biliaderis, CG & Zerfiridis, GK 2002 Low-fat white-brine cheese made from bovine milk and two commercial fat mimetics: chemical, physical and sensory attributes. International Dairy Journal 12 525540CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rudan, MA & Barbano, DM 1998 A model of Mozzarella cheese melting and browning during pizza baking. Journal of Dairy Science 81 23122319CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rudan, MA, Barbano, DM & Kindstedt, PS 1998 Effect of fat replacer (Salatrim®) on chemical, composition, proteolysis, functionality, appearance, and yield of reduced fat Mozzarella cheese. International Dairy Journal 81 20772088CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rudan, M, Barbano, DM, Yun, JJ & Kindstedt, PS 1999 Effect of fat reduction on composition, proteolysis, functionality, and yield of Mozzarella Cheese. Journal Dairy Science 82 661662CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
SAS® 1995 User's Guide: Statistics, Version 6.12 Edition. Cary, NC: SAS InstituteGoogle Scholar
Sipahioglu, O, Alvarez, VB & Solano-Lopez, C 1999 Structure, physico-chemical and sensory properties of feta cheese made with tapioca starch and lecithin as fat mimetics. International Dairy Journal 9 783789CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stevens, A & Shah, NP 2002 Texturel and melting properties of Mozzarella cheese made with fat replacers. Milchwissenschaft 57 387390Google Scholar
Tunick, MH, Malin, EL, Smith, PW, Shien, JJ, Sullivan, BC, Mackey, KL & Holsinger, VH 1993 Proteolysis and rheology of low fat and full fat Mozzarella cheeses prepared from homogenized milk. Journal Dairy Science 76 36213628CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Volikakis, P, Biliaderis, CG, Vamvakas, C & Zerfiridis, GK 2004 Effects of a commercial oat-β-glucan concentrate on the chemical, physico-chemical and sensory attributes of a low-fat white-brined cheese product. Food Research International 37 8394CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zalazar, CA, Zalazar, CS, Bernal, S, Bertola, N, Bevilacqua, A & Zaritzky, N 2002 Effect of moisture level and fat replacer on physicochemical, rheological and sensory properties of low fat soft cheese. International Dairy Journal 12 4550CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zisu, B & Shah, NP 2005 Textural and functional changes in low-fat Mozzarella cheeses in relation to proteolysis and microstructure as influenced by the use of fat replacers, pre-acidification and EPS starter. International Dairy Journal 15 957972CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 32
Total number of PDF views: 153 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 7th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Influence of fat replacers on chemical composition, proteolysis, texture profiles, meltability and sensory properties of low-fat Kashar cheese
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Influence of fat replacers on chemical composition, proteolysis, texture profiles, meltability and sensory properties of low-fat Kashar cheese
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Influence of fat replacers on chemical composition, proteolysis, texture profiles, meltability and sensory properties of low-fat Kashar cheese
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *