Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-77ffc5d9c7-95vkd Total loading time: 0.418 Render date: 2021-04-22T17:06:47.634Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Evaluation of xanthosine treatment on gene expression of mammary glands in early lactating goats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 August 2018

Ratan K Choudhary
Affiliation:
School of Animal Biotechnology, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Science University (GADVASU), Ludhiana – 101004, India
Shanti Choudhary
Affiliation:
School of Animal Biotechnology, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Science University (GADVASU), Ludhiana – 101004, India
Devendra Pathak
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Anatomy, GADVASU, Ludhiana – 101004, India
Rahul Udehiya
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, GADVASU, Ludhiana – 101004, India
Ramneek Verma
Affiliation:
School of Animal Biotechnology, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Science University (GADVASU), Ludhiana – 101004, India
Sandeep Kaswan
Affiliation:
Department of Livestock Production & Management, GADVASU, Ludhiana – 101004, India
Arpan Sharma
Affiliation:
Department of Livestock Production & Management, GADVASU, Ludhiana – 101004, India
Dhiraj Gupta
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, GADVASU, Ludhiana – 101004, India
Mrigank Honparkhe
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Gynaecology & Obstetrics, GADVASU, Ludhiana – 101004, India
Anthony V Capuco
Affiliation:
Animal Genomics and Improvement Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This study examined the hypothesis that xanthosine (XS) treatment would promote mammary-specific gene expression and stem cell transcripts and have a positive influence on milk yield of dairy goats. Seven primiparous Beetal goats were assigned to the study. Five days after kidding, one gland (either left or right) was infused with XS (TRT) twice daily for 3 d and the other gland with no XS infusion served as a control (CON). Mammary biopsies were collected at 10 d and RNA was isolated. Gene expression analysis of milk synthesis genes, mammary stem/progenitor cell markers, cell proliferation and differentiation markers were performed using real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Results showed that the transcripts of milk synthesis genes (BLG4, CSN2, LALBA, FABP3, CD36) and mammary stem/progenitor cell markers (ALDH1 and NR5A2) were increased in as a result of XS treatment. Average milk yield in TRT glands was increased marginally (approximately ~2% P = 0·05, paired t-test) per gland relative to CON gland until 7 wk. After 7 wk, milk yield of TRT and CON glands did not differ. Analysis of milk composition revealed that protein, lactose, fat and solids-not-fat percentages remained the same in TRT and CON glands. These results suggest that XS increases expression of milk synthesis genes, mammary stem/progenitor cells and has a small effect on milk yield.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Hannah Dairy Research Foundation 2018 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Baldassarre, H, Deslauriers, J, Neveu, N & Bordignon, V 2011 Detection of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers and production enhancement treatments in transgenic goats expressing recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase. Transgenic Research 20 12651272CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bouillez, A, Gnemmi, V, Gaudelot, K, Hemon, B, Ringot, B, Pottier, N, Glowacki, F, Butruille, C, Cauffiez, C, Hamdane, M, Sergeant, N, Van Seuningen, I, Leroy, X, Aubert, S & Perrais, M 2014 MUC1-C nuclear localization drives invasiveness of renal cancer cells through a sheddase/gamma secretase dependent pathway. Oncotarget 5 754763CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Capuco, AV, Evock-Clover, CM, Minuti, A & Wood, DL 2009 In vivo expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosine infusion. Experimental Biology and Medicine 234 475482CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chen, W, Wang, H, Tao, S, Zheng, Y, Wu, W, Lian, F, Jaramillo, M, Fang, D & Zhang, DD 2013 Tumor protein translationally controlled 1 is a p53 target gene that promotes cell survival. Cell Cycle 12 23212328CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Choudhary, RK & Capuco, AV 2012 In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosine treatment. BMC Cell Biology 13 14CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Choudhary, RK, Li, RW, Evock-Clover, CM & Capuco, AV 2013 Comparison of the transcriptomes of long-term label retaining-cells and control cells microdissected from mammary epithelium: an initial study to characterize potential stem/progenitor cells. Frontiers in Oncology 3 21CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Choudhary, RK, Choudhary, S, Kaur, H & Pathak, D 2016 Expression of putative stem cell marker, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, in mammary gland of water buffalo. Animal Biotechnology 27 182189CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Choudhary, S & Choudhary, RK 2017 Rapid and efficient method of total RNA isolation from milk fat for transcriptome analysis of mammary gland. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, India Section B: Biological Sciences https://doi.org/10.1007/s40011-017-0955-8Google Scholar
Colitti, M & Parillo, F 2013 Immunolocalization of estrogen and progesterone receptors in ewe mammary glands. Microscopy Research and Technique 76 955962CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
De Stefano, I, Zannoni, GF, Prisco, MG, Fagotti, A, Tortorella, L, Vizzielli, G, Mencaglia, L, Scambia, G & Gallo, D 2011 Cytoplasmic expression of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) predicts poor clinical outcome in advanced serous ovarian cancer. Gynecologic Oncology 122 573579CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dontu, G, Jackson, KW, McNicholas, E, Kawamura, MJ, Abdallah, WM & Wicha, MS 2004 Role of notch signaling in cell-fate determination of human mammary stem/progenitor cells. Breast Cancer Research 6 R605R615CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ginestier, C, Hur, MH, Charafe-Jauffret, E, Monville, F, Dutcher, J, Brown, M, Jacquemier, J, Viens, P, Kleer, CG, Liu, S, Schott, A, Hayes, D, Birnbaum, D, Wicha, MS & Dontu, G 2007 ALDH1 is a marker of normal and malignant human mammary stem cells and a predictor of poor clinical outcome. Cell Stem Cell 1 555567CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gonçalves, CF, Morais, MO, de CG Alencar, R, Mota, ED, Silva, TA, Batista, AC & Mendonça, EF 2011 Expression of Ki-67 and MUC1 in mucoepidermoid carcinomas of young and adult patients: prognostic implications. Experimental and Molecular Pathology 90 271275CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hart, IC & Morant, SV 1980 Roles of prolactin, growth hormone, insulin and thyroxine in steroid-induced lactation in goats. Journal of Endocrinology 84 343351CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heng, J-CD, Feng, B, Han, J, Jiang, J, Kraus, P, Ng, J-H, Orlov, YL, Huss, M, Yang, L, Lufkin, T, Lim, B & Ng, H-Hl 2010 The nuclear receptor Nr5a2 can replace oct4 in the reprogramming of murine somatic cells to pluripotent cells. Cell Stem Cell 6 167174CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kapila, N, Kishore, A, Sodhi, M, Sharma, A, Kumar, P, Mohanty, aK, Jerath, T & Mukesh, M 2013 Identification of appropriate reference genes for qRT-PCR analysis of heat-stressed mammary epithelial cells in riverine buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis). ISRN Biotechnology 2013 19CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, H-S, Crane, GG, Merok, JR, Tunstead, JR, Hatch, NL, Panchalingam, K, Powers, MJ, Griffith, LG & Sherley, JL 2003 Clonal expansion of adult rat hepatic stem cell lines by suppression of asymmetric cell kinetics (SACK). Biotechnology and Bioengineering 83 760771CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, Y, Yi, H, Yao, Y, Liao, X, Xie, Y, Yang, J, Yan, Z, Wang, L, Lu, S, Kuang, Y, Gu, M, Fei, J, Wang, Z & Huang, L 2011 The cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 induces hyperplasia in the mammary gland and correlates with nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. PloS One 6 e19102Google ScholarPubMed
Meyer, MJ, Capuco, AV, Boisclair, YR & Van Amburgh, ME 2006 Estrogen-dependent responses of the mammary fat pad in prepubertal dairy heifers. Journal of Endocrinology 190 819827CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Osińska, E, Wicik, Z, Godlewski, MM, Pawłowski, K, Majewska, A, Mucha, J, Gajewska, M & Motyl, T 2014 Comparison of stem/progenitor cell number and transcriptomic profile in the mammary tissue of dairy and beef breed heifers. Journal of Applied Genetics 55 383395CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rambhatla, L, Bohn, SA, Stadler, PB, Boyd, JT, Coss, RA & Sherley, JL 2001 Cellular senescence: ex vivo p53-dependent asymmetric cell kinetics. Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology 1 2837CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rauner, G & Barash, I 2014 Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation. Experimental Cell Research 328 186196CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Safayi, S, Theil, PK, Hou, L, Engbaek, M, Nørgaard, JV, Sejrsen, K & Nielsen, MO 2010 Continuous lactation effects on mammary remodeling during late gestation and lactation in dairy goats. Journal of Dairy Science 93 203217CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schindelin, J, Arganda-Carreras, I, Frise, E, Kaynig, V, Longair, M, Pietzsch, T, Preibisch, S, Rueden, C, Saalfeld, S, Schmid, B, Tinevez, J-Y, White, DJ, Hartenstein, V, Eliceiri, K, Tomancak, P & Cardona, A 2012 Fiji: an open-source platform for biological-image analysis. Nature Methods 9 676682CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spitsberg, VL, Matitashvili, E & Gorewit, RC 1995 Association and coexpression of fatty-acid-binding protein and glycoprotein CD36 in the bovine mammary gland. European Journal of Biochemistry 230 872878CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thornton, B & Basu, C 2011 Real-time PCR (qPCR) primer design using free online software. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 39 145154CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vandesompele, J, De Preter, K, Pattyn, F, Poppe, B, Van Roy, N, De Paepe, A & Speleman, F 2002 Accurate normalization of real-time quantitative RT-PCR data by geometric averaging of multiple internal control genes. Genome Biology 3 111CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Welsh, AW, Lannin, DR, Young, GS, Sherman, ME, Figueroa, JD, Henry, NL, Ryden, L, Kim, C, Love, RR, Schiff, R & Rimm, DL 2012 Cytoplasmic estrogen receptor in breast cancer. Clinical Cancer Research 18 118126CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ye, J, Coulouris, G, Zaretskaya, I, Cutcutache, I, Rozen, S & Madden, TL 2012 Primer-BLAST: a tool to design target-specific primers for polymerase chain reaction. BMC Bioinformatics 13 134CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yohe, TT, Tucker, HLM, Parsons, CLM, Geiger, AJ, Akers, RM & Daniels, KM 2016 Short communication: initial evidence supporting existence of potential rumen epidermal stem and progenitor cells. Journal of Dairy Science 99 76547660CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Choudhary et al. supplementary material

Tables S1 and S2

PDF 143 KB

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 7
Total number of PDF views: 40 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 29th August 2018 - 22nd April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Evaluation of xanthosine treatment on gene expression of mammary glands in early lactating goats
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Evaluation of xanthosine treatment on gene expression of mammary glands in early lactating goats
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Evaluation of xanthosine treatment on gene expression of mammary glands in early lactating goats
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *