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Effects of FABP4 variation on milk fatty-acid composition for dairy cattle grazed on pasture in late lactation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2020


Yunhai Li
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln7647, New Zealand
Huitong Zhou
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln7647, New Zealand
Long Cheng
Affiliation:
Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, Dookie College, The University of Melbourne, Victoria3647, Australia
Miriam Hodge
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln7647, New Zealand
Jenny Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln7647, New Zealand
Rosy Tung
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln7647, New Zealand
Grant Edwards
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln7647, New Zealand
Jonathan Hickford
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln7647, New Zealand
Corresponding

Abstract

This research communication describes associations between variation in the fatty acid binding protein 4 gene (FABP4) and milk fat composition in New Zealand Holstein-Friesian × Jersey cross dairy cows. After correcting for the effect of the amino acid substitution p.K232A in diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), which is associated with variation in many milk fatty acid (FA) component levels, the effect of FABP4 c.328A/G on milk FA levels was typically small. For the five genotypes analysed, the AB cows produced more medium-chain fatty acids than CC cows (P < 0.05), and more C14:0 FA than AA and AC cows (P < 0.05). The AA and AC cows produced less C22:0 FA (P < 0.01) than the BC cows, and the AC cows produced more C24:0 FA (P < 0.05) than was produced by the BC cows. Cows of genotype CC produce more long-chain fatty acids than cows of genotype BC (P < 0.05).


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Hannah Dairy Research Foundation 2020

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References

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Li et al. supplementary material

Li et al. supplementary material

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