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The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the nutritive value of milk

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

Margaret E. Gregory
Affiliation:
National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading
Kathleen M. Henry
Affiliation:
National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading
S. K. Kon
Affiliation:
National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading
J. W. G. Porter
Affiliation:
National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading
S. Y. Thompson
Affiliation:
National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading
Margaret I. W. Benjamin
Affiliation:
Dairy Department, University of Reading

Summary

Treatment of milk with 0·05% (w/v) H2O2 for 8 h at 24°C had no significant effect on the concentrations of seven of the B-complex vitamins or of the fatsoluble vitamins A and E or of carotene. Rat tests showed that the nutritive value of the milk proteins was slightly reduced. This finding was confirmed by microbiological tests with Streptococcus zymogenes, which also showed that the loss was probably connected with that of methionine. The concentration of H2O2 used was effective in controlling bacterial growth during the incubation period, even in a sample of milk with a high initial bacterial count.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1961

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