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White paper from a CTSA workshop series on special and underserved populations: Enhancing investigator readiness to conduct research involving LGBT populations

  • Alicia K. Matthews (a1), Kevin Rak (a2), Emily Anderson (a3), Wendy Bostwick (a1), Jesus Ramirez-Valles (a4), Raymond A. Ruiz (a2), Kathryn Macapagal (a5), Karriem S. Watson (a6), Rohan D. Jeremiah (a4), Amparo Castillo (a7) and Wendy Choure (a2)...

Abstract

Despite the significant health disparities experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations, few investigators affiliated with the National Institutes of Health-funded Clinical and Translational Science Award Programs are conducting research related to this underserved population. We provide recommendations shared during a half-day workshop aimed at increasing researcher readiness to conduct LGBT research. This workshop was presented as part of a series on conducting research with underserved populations offered by the Recruitment, Retention, and Community Engagement Program of the Center for Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Six LGBT health research experts provided focused presentations. The workshop presentations included a summary of significant health inequality issues, theoretical models relevant to research on LGBT health, best practices in measuring sexual orientation and gender identity, recommendations for recruitment and retention, a discussion of community engagement, and ethical considerations in conducting LGBT research. We provide a summary of recommendations to guide future research, training, and public policy related to LGBT health. The information can increase capacity among Clinical and Translational Science Award affiliated researchers in conducting research in this special population.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: A. K. Matthews, PhD, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. (Email: aliciak@uic.edu)

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