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Situating dissemination and implementation sciences within and across the translational research spectrum

  • Aaron L. Leppin (a1), Jane E. Mahoney (a2), Kathleen R. Stevens (a3), Stephen J. Bartels (a4), Laura-Mae Baldwin (a5), Rowena J. Dolor (a6), Enola K. Proctor (a7), Linda Scholl (a8), Justin B. Moore (a9), Ana A. Baumann (a7), Catherine L. Rohweder (a10), Joan Luby (a11) and Paul Meissner (a12)...

Abstract

The efficient and effective movement of research into practice is acknowledged as crucial to improving population health and assuring return on investment in healthcare research. The National Center for Advancing Translational Science which sponsors Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) recognizes that dissemination and implementation (D&I) sciences have matured over the last 15 years and are central to its goals to shift academic health institutions to better align with this reality. In 2016, the CTSA Collaboration and Engagement Domain Task Force chartered a D&I Science Workgroup to explore the role of D&I sciences across the translational research spectrum. This special communication discusses the conceptual distinctions and purposes of dissemination, implementation, and translational sciences. We propose an integrated framework and provide real-world examples for articulating the role of D&I sciences within and across all of the translational research spectrum. The framework’s major proposition is that it situates D&I sciences as targeted “sub-sciences” of translational science to be used by CTSAs, and others, to identify and investigate coherent strategies for more routinely and proactively accelerating research translation. The framework highlights the importance of D&I thought leaders in extending D&I principles to all research stages.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: A. L. Leppin, MD, MS, Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Email: Leppin.aaron@mayo.edu

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