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Researcher perspectives on embedding community stakeholders in T1–T2 research: A potential new model for full-spectrum translational research

  • Sheba George (a1) (a2), Stefanie D. Vassar (a3) (a4), Keith Norris (a3), Bernice Coleman (a5), Cynthia Gonzalez (a1), Mariko Ishimori (a5), D’Ann Morris (a3), Norma Mtume (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4) (a5) (a6), Martin F. Shapiro (a6), Anna Lucas-Wright (a1) (a3) and Arleen F. Brown (a3) (a4)...

Abstract

Effective community engagement in T3–T4 research is widespread, however, similar stakeholder involvement is missing in T1–T2 research. As part of an effort to embed community stakeholders in T1–T2 research, an academic community partnered team conducted discussion groups with researchers to assess perspectives on (1) barriers/challenges to including community stakeholders in basic science, (2) skills/training required for stakeholders and researchers, and (3) potential benefits of these activities. Engaging community in basic science research was perceived as challenging but with exciting potential to incorporate “real-life” community health priorities into basic research, resulting in a new full-spectrum translational research model.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: S. George, PhD, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, 1731 E. 120th Street, 1st Floor, LSRNE Building. Email: shebageorge@ucla.edu

References

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