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Realizing the full potential of precision health: The need to include patient-reported health behavior, mental health, social determinants, and patient preferences data

  • Russell E. Glasgow (a1) (a2) (a3), Bethany M. Kwan (a1) (a2) and Daniel D. Matlock (a2) (a3) (a4)

Abstract

Precision health and big data approaches have great potential, yet such benefits will be realized only when social and behavioral determinants of health and patient preferences are combined with genomic information. Literature review and co-author experiences informed this commentary. Validated health behavior, mental health, and patient preference measures were collected and summarized in real time. Integration of such data into existing data sets will advance precision health, patient-centered care, research, and policy.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: R. E. Glasgow, PhD, Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado, 12631 E. 17th Avenue, AO1, #3421, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. (Email: Russell.glasgow@ucdenver.edu)

References

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Keywords

Realizing the full potential of precision health: The need to include patient-reported health behavior, mental health, social determinants, and patient preferences data

  • Russell E. Glasgow (a1) (a2) (a3), Bethany M. Kwan (a1) (a2) and Daniel D. Matlock (a2) (a3) (a4)

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