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Opportunities for life course research through the integration of data across Clinical and Translational Research Institutes

  • Heidi A. Hanson (a1), William W. Hay (a2), Jonathan N. Tobin (a3), Shari L. Barkin (a4), Mark Atkins (a5), Margaret R. Karagas (a6), Ann M. Dozier (a7), Cynthia Wetmore (a8), Michael W. Konstan (a9) and James E. Heubi (a10)...

Abstract

Introduction

Early life exposures affect health and disease across the life course and potentially across multiple generations. The Clinical and Translational Research Institutes (CTSIs) offer an opportunity to utilize and link existing databases to conduct lifespan research.

Methods

A survey with Lifespan Domain Taskforce expert input was created and distributed to lead lifespan researchers at each of the 64 CTSIs. The survey requested information regarding institutional databases related to early life exposure, child-maternal health, or lifespan research.

Results

Of 64 CTSI, 88% provided information on a total of 130 databases. Approximately 59% (n=76/130) had an associated biorepository. Longitudinal data were available for 72% (n=93/130) of reported databases. Many of the biorepositories (n=44/76; 68%) have standard operating procedures that can be shared with other researchers.

Conclusions

The majority of CTSI databases and biorepositories focusing on child-maternal health and lifespan research could be leveraged for lifespan research, increased generalizability and enhanced multi-institutional research in the United States.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the same Creative Commons licence is included and the original work is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: H. A. Hanson, PhD, Huntsman Cancer Institute, #1501, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. (Email: Heidi.hanson@hci.utah.edu)

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