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Dissemination and implementation science activities across the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium: Report from a survey of CTSA leaders

  • Rowena J. Dolor (a1), Enola Proctor (a2), Kathleen R. Stevens (a3), Leslie R. Boone (a4), Paul Meissner (a5) and Laura-Mae Baldwin (a6)...

Abstract

Introduction:

Dissemination and implementation (D&I) science is not a formal element of the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Program, and D&I science activities across the CTSA Consortium are largely unknown.

Methods:

The CTSA Dissemination, Implementation, and Knowledge Translation Working Group surveyed CTSA leaders to explore D&I science-related activities, barriers, and needed supports, then conducted univariate and qualitative analyses of the data.

Results:

Out of 67 CTSA leaders, 55.2% responded. CTSAs reported directly funding D&I programs (54.1%), training (51.4%), and projects (59.5%). Indirect support (e.g., promoted by CTSA without direct funding) for D&I activities was higher – programs (70.3%), training (64.9%), and projects (54.1%). Top barriers included funding (39.4%), limited D&I science faculty (30.3%), and lack of D&I science understanding (27.3%). Respondents (63.4%) noted the importance of D&I training and recommended coordination of D&I activities across CTSAs hubs (33.3%).

Conclusion:

These findings should guide CTSA leadership in efforts to raise awareness and advance the role of D&I science in improving population health.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: R. J. Dolor, MD, MHS, Duke General Internal Medicine, 200 Morris Street, 3rd floor, Durham, NC 27701, USA. Email: rowena.dolor@duke.edu

Footnotes

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For the Dissemination, Implementation, and Knowledge Transfer (DI&KT) Working Group (see Appendix).

Footnotes

References

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16. National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. About the CTSA program, 2018. https://ncats.nih.gov/ctsa/about Accessed September 17, 2019

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Supplementary materials

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Dissemination and implementation science activities across the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium: Report from a survey of CTSA leaders

  • Rowena J. Dolor (a1), Enola Proctor (a2), Kathleen R. Stevens (a3), Leslie R. Boone (a4), Paul Meissner (a5) and Laura-Mae Baldwin (a6)...

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