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Community advisory boards: Experiences and common practices of clinical and translational science award programs

  • M. Kathryn Stewart (a1), Beatrice Boateng (a2), Yvonne Joosten (a3), Dana Burshell (a4), Hilary Broughton (a5), Karen Calhoun (a6), Anna Huff Davis (a7), Rachel Hale (a7), Nicola Spencer (a7), Patricia Piechowski (a6) and Laura James (a2)...

Abstract

Community advisory boards (CABs) are a valuable strategy for engaging and partnering with communities in research. Eighty-nine percent of Clinical and Translational Science Awardees (CTSA) responding to a 2011 survey reported having a CAB. CTSAs’ experiences with CABs are valuable for informing future practice. This study was conducted to describe common CAB implementation practices among CTSAs; document perceived benefits, challenges, and contributions; and examine their progress toward desirable outcomes. A cross-CTSA collaborative team collected survey data from respondents representing academic and/or community members affiliated with CTSAs with CABs. Data representing 44 CTSAs with CABs were analyzed using descriptive statistics. A majority of respondents reported practices reflecting respect for CAB members’ expertise and input such as compensation (75%), advisory purview beyond their CTSA’s Community Engagement program (88%), and influence over CAB operations. Three-quarters provide members with orientation and training on roles and responsibilities and 89% reported evaluating their CAB. Almost all respondents indicated their CTSA incorporates the feedback of their CABs to some degree; over half do so a lot or completely. This study profiles practices that inform CTSAs implementing a CAB and provide an evaluative benchmark for those with existing CABs.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: M. K. Stewart, MD, MPH, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Slot 820, Little Rock, AR, USA. Email: stewartmaryk@uams.edu

References

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1. Community Engagement Key Function Committee Task Force C. Principles of Community Engagement, Second Edition Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium Community Engagement Key Function Committee Task Force on the Principles of Community Engagement. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/communityengagement/pdf/PCE_Report_508_FINAL.pdf. Accessed January 2, 2019.
2. Wilkins, CH, et al. Community representatives’ involvement in clinical and translational science awardee activities. Clinical and Translational Science 2013; 6(4): 292296. doi: 10.1111/cts.12072.
3. Delaney, EM, et al. Community advisory boards in HIV research: current scientific status and future directions. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 2012; 59(4): e78e81. http://www.embase.com/search/results?subaction=viewrecord&from=export&id=L364620781.
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10. National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. About the CTSA Program. https://ncats.nih.gov/ctsa/about. Accessed January 3, 2019.
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Community advisory boards: Experiences and common practices of clinical and translational science award programs

  • M. Kathryn Stewart (a1), Beatrice Boateng (a2), Yvonne Joosten (a3), Dana Burshell (a4), Hilary Broughton (a5), Karen Calhoun (a6), Anna Huff Davis (a7), Rachel Hale (a7), Nicola Spencer (a7), Patricia Piechowski (a6) and Laura James (a2)...

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