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A collaborative, academic approach to optimizing the national clinical research infrastructure: The first year of the Trial Innovation Network

  • Gordon R. Bernard (a1), Paul A. Harris (a1), Jill M. Pulley (a1), Daniel K. Benjamin (a2), Jonathan Michael Dean (a3), Daniel E. Ford (a4), Daniel F. Hanley (a5), Harry P. Selker (a6) and Consuelo H. Wilkins (a7)...

Abstract

Inefficiencies in the national clinical research infrastructure have been apparent for decades. The National Center for Advancing Translational Science—sponsored Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program is able to address such inefficiencies. The Trial Innovation Network (TIN) is a collaborative initiative with the CTSA program and other National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers that addresses critical roadblocks to accelerate the translation of novel interventions to clinical practice. The TIN’s mission is to execute high-quality trials in a quick, cost-efficient manner. The TIN awardees are composed of 3 Trial Innovation Centers, the Recruitment Innovation Center, and the individual CTSA institutions that have identified TIN Liaison units. The TIN has launched a national scale single (central) Institutional Review Board system, master contracting agreements, quality-by-design approaches, novel recruitment support methods, and applies evidence-based strategies to recruitment and patient engagement. The TIN has received 113 submissions from 39 different CTSA institutions and 8 non-CTSA Institutions, with projects associated with 12 different NIH Institutes and Centers across a wide range of clinical/disease areas. Already more than 150 unique health systems/organizations are involved as sites in TIN-related multisite studies. The TIN will begin to capture data and metrics that quantify increased efficiency and quality improvement during operations.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: G. R. Bernard, MD, Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2525 West End Ave, 6th floor, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. (Email: gordon.bernard@vumc.org)

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