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Bridging the gap between research, policy, and practice: Lessons learned from academic–public partnerships in the CTSA network

  • Amytis Towfighi (a1) (a2), Allison Zumberge Orechwa (a1), Tomás J. Aragón (a3), Marc Atkins (a4), Arleen F. Brown (a2) (a5), Jen Brown (a6), Olveen Carrasquillo (a7), Savanna Carson (a5), Paula Fleisher (a8), Erika Gustafson (a4), Deborah K. Herman (a5), Moira Inkelas (a5), Wylie Liu (a8), Daniella Meeker (a1), Tara Mehta (a4), Doriane C. Miller (a9), Rachelle Paul-Brutus (a10), Michael B. Potter (a8), Sarah S. Ritner (a11), Brendaly Rodriguez (a7), Dana Rusch (a4), Anne Skinner (a5) and Hal F. Yee (a2)...
  • Please note a correction has been issued for this article.

Abstract

A primary barrier to translation of clinical research discoveries into care delivery and population health is the lack of sustainable infrastructure bringing researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and communities together to reduce silos in knowledge and action. As National Institutes of Healthʼs (NIH) mechanism to advance translational research, Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) awardees are uniquely positioned to bridge this gap. Delivering on this promise requires sustained collaboration and alignment between research institutions and public health and healthcare programs and services. We describe the collaboration of seven CTSA hubs with city, county, and state healthcare and public health organizations striving to realize this vision together. Partnership representatives convened monthly to identify key components, common and unique themes, and barriers in academic–public collaborations. All partnerships aligned the activities of the CTSA programs with the needs of the city/county/state partners, by sharing resources, responding to real-time policy questions and training needs, promoting best practices, and advancing community-engaged research, and dissemination and implementation science to narrow the knowledge-to-practice gap. Barriers included competing priorities, differing timelines, bureaucratic hurdles, and unstable funding. Academic–public health/health system partnerships represent a unique and underutilized model with potential to enhance community and population health.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Address for Correspondence: A. Towfighi, MD, 1100 N State Street, A4E, Los Angeles, CA90033, USA. Email: atowfighi@dhs.lacounty.gov

Footnotes

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Amytis Towfighi is Chair and Allison Zumberge Orechwa is Vice-Chair.

Sarah S. Rittner's name has been corrected. Additionally, a note stating the first and second authors' roles has been added. A corrigendum detailing these changes has also been published (doi: 10.1017/cts.2020.495).

Footnotes

References

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Bridging the gap between research, policy, and practice: Lessons learned from academic–public partnerships in the CTSA network

  • Amytis Towfighi (a1) (a2), Allison Zumberge Orechwa (a1), Tomás J. Aragón (a3), Marc Atkins (a4), Arleen F. Brown (a2) (a5), Jen Brown (a6), Olveen Carrasquillo (a7), Savanna Carson (a5), Paula Fleisher (a8), Erika Gustafson (a4), Deborah K. Herman (a5), Moira Inkelas (a5), Wylie Liu (a8), Daniella Meeker (a1), Tara Mehta (a4), Doriane C. Miller (a9), Rachelle Paul-Brutus (a10), Michael B. Potter (a8), Sarah S. Ritner (a11), Brendaly Rodriguez (a7), Dana Rusch (a4), Anne Skinner (a5) and Hal F. Yee (a2)...
  • Please note a correction has been issued for this article.

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