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67702 At-Home Screening Tool for Anosmia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 March 2021

Shruti Gupta
Affiliation:
Washington University School of Medicine
Dorina Kallogjeri
Affiliation:
Washington University School of Medicine
Jay F Piccirillo
Affiliation:
Washington University School of Medicine
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Abstract

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ABSTRACT IMPACT: By developing and validating a simple and cost-effective at-home screening tool for loss of smell, we can efficiently detect infection with COVID-19, neuropsychiatric disease such as Alzheimer’s, and post-operative smell loss. OBJECTIVES/GOALS: To develop and validate a feasible and cost-effective screening tool for olfactory dysfunction (OD) using common household items. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: The study has two phases. In the Development phase, 120 participants with self-reported smell changes will complete a survey with a list of 45 household items to smell. Item reduction to develop the NASAL Short Smell Test will occur by measuring content validity, factor analysis, and internal consistency. In the Validation phase, 200 participants with self-reported smell changes will take the NASAL Short Smell Test at baseline and again at three weeks. In both phases, the validated University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) will be used as the gold standard. Measures of performance as well as test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change will be measured. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: We anticipate that the majority of participants will have at least half of the items in their household and will report ability to smell for each. Measures of sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and UPSIT score correlations will allow us to evaluate performance of each item. Item reduction will allow us to create the NASAL Short Smell Test, in which a handful of common items will be used to create a screening tool for smell loss. The Validation phase will allow us to measure discriminative performance of this tool as well as test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change, which we expect to be at least comparable to the validated UPSIT. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF FINDINGS: Current tools for diagnosis of OD are costly, time-consuming, and often require a clinician to evaluate. The validation of the simple at-home NASAL Short Smell Test to screen for OD will allow us to detect infection with COVID-19, neuropsychiatric disease, or post-operative smell loss quickly and efficiently.

Type
Translational Science, Policy, & Health Outcomes Science
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2021
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