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3312 Understanding Community-engaged Research at an Academic Medical Center and Learning Healthcare System in the US South

  • Megan Bennett-Irby (a1), Phillip Summers (a2), Keena R. Moore (a2), Stephanie Daniel (a2), Jospeh A. Skelton (a2) and Scott D. Rhodes (a1)...

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: Wake Forest Baptist Health (WFBH) is an Academic Learning Healthcare System (aLHS) serving 24 counties in North Carolina and Virginia. Like many aLHSs, WFBH experiences strained community relationships attributable to a history of medical and research abuses against marginalized populations. This legacy accompanies longstanding community mistrust in the healthcare system and research. To overcome these challenges, community-engaged research (CEnR) approaches have potential to repair community-academic relationships, improve public health, and empower groups that traditionally have been neglected by or overlooked in research. To develop and revise our understanding of how CEnR is harnessed at WFBH, semi-structured interviews were conducted with investigators and study staff experienced in CEnR approaches. In-depth interview guides were designed iteratively to capture socio-contextual and detailed descriptions of perceptions, experiences, and strategies specific to the use of CEnR. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: A keyword search performed within WFBH study records identified 51 investigators whom had submitted research proposals related to CEnR within the past ten years. Sixteen were confirmed eligible based on a review of proposal abstracts, of which 14 responded to email invitations agreeing to participate. Four additional participants were referred by initial participants. Eighteen investigators (16 faculty and 2 research associates) provided consent and completed Interviews. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: The participant sample was 50% female with a mean age of 55 years, 11% Black and 89% White, with representation across various academic backgrounds (e.g., anthropology, medicine, psychology, and public health) A majority of participants (89%) hold doctoral degrees (i.e., PhD, DrPH, EdD, MD, and MD-PhD). On average, participants had been employed at WFBH for 13.9 years, and represented various departments including dermatology, epidemiology and prevention, family medicine, neurology, social sciences and health policy, and psychiatry. Nearly all participants (89%) indicated they had never received formal education or training in CEnR, though 100% reported “on-the-job” training in CEnR. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed following an inductive thematic approach, from which twenty-two themes emerged across six domains related to CEnR (Table 2), including: Conceptualization and Purpose, Value and Investment, Community-Academic Partnerships, Sustainability, Facilitators, and Challenges. Results also provided key characteristics that define CEnR (Table 3), and yielded 11 emerging needs necessary to enhance CEnR within aLHSs (Table 4). DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: The results of this study provide information critical to understanding how CEnR frameworks and approaches can be harnessed not just in Schools of Public Health, but within aLHSs to build and repair community-academic partnerships, inform research and institutional priorities, and address community health concerns. Despite the small sample size, the number of participant interviews was sufficient to achieve saturation while also providing broad and unique perspectives across various fields and CEnR approaches. Overall, participants conceptualized the purpose and goals of CEnR quite similarly, though there was a great deal of variance in how CEnR was defined and operationalized across interviews, indicating a need to more clearly articulate important features that enhance understanding of what CEnR is and what it is not (Table 3). These discrepancies and inconsistencies indicate a potential need for additional formal training in the understanding and use of CEnR approaches, which is supported by the fact that nearly all participants reported receiving no formal training in CEnR. Across all interviews, participants expressed a need for health care providers and researchers to better understand community contexts, social determinants of health, and historical factors influencing community health and participation in research (Table 4). This work and the data presented here are important for informing CEnR approaches and will be useful for guiding the development of a model incorporating the core tenets of CEnR within the mission, vision, and priorities of aLHSs.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

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