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3167 Evaluation of risk factors for progression from carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bacteriuria to an invasive infection

  • Jessica Howard-Anderson (a1), Rebekah Blakney (a2), Christopher Bower (a1), Mary Elizabeth Sexton (a1), Sarah W. Satola (a1), Monica M. Farley (a1) and Jesse T. Jacob (a1)...

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: To describe the epidemiology of patients with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) bacteriuria in metropolitan Atlanta, GA and to identify risk factors associated with progression to an invasive CRE infection. We hypothesize that having an indwelling urinary catheter increases the risk of progression. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: The Georgia Emerging Infections Program (EIP) performs active population- and laboratory-based surveillance to identify CRE isolated from a sterile site (e.g. blood) or urine among patients who reside in the 8-county metropolitan Atlanta area (population ~4 million). The Georgia EIP performs a chart review of each case to extract data on demographics, culture location, resistance patterns, healthcare exposures, and other underlying risk factors. We used a retrospective cohort study design to include all Georgia EIP cases with Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, or Klebsiella (formerly Enterobacter) aerogenes, adapting the current EIP definition of resistance to only include isolates resistant to meropenem, imipenem or doripenem (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥ 4) first identified in a urine culture from 8/1/2011 to 7/31/2017. Patients with CRE identified in a sterile site culture prior to a urine culture will be excluded. Within this cohort, we will identify which patients had a subsequent similar CRE isolate identified from a sterile site between one day and one year after the original urine culture was identified (termed “progression”). CRE isolates will be defined as similar if they are the same species and have the same carbapenem susceptibility pattern. Univariable analyses using T-tests or other nonparametric tests for continuous variables, and Chi-square tests (or Fisher’s exact tests as appropriate) for categorical variables will compare patient demographics, comorbidities and presence of invasive devices including urinary catheters between patients who had progression to an invasive infection and those who did not have progression. Covariates with a p-value of < 0.2 will be eligible for inclusion in the multivariable logistic regression model with progression to invasive infection as the primary outcome. All statistical analyses will be done in SAS 9.4. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: From 8/1/2011 to 7/31/2017 we have preliminarily identified 546 patients with CRE first identified in urine, representing an annual incidence rate of 1.1 cases per 100,000 population. Most cases were K. pneumoniae (352, 64%), followed by E. coli (117, 21%), E. cloacae (48, 9%), K. aerogenes (18, 3%), and K. oxytoca (11, 2%). The mean patient age was 64 +/− 18 years and the majority (308, 56%) were female. Clinical characterization through chart review was available for 507 patients. The majority of the patients were black (301, 59%), followed by white (166, 33%), Asian (12, 2%), and other or unknown race (28, 6%). 466 (92%) patients had at least one underlying comorbid condition with a median Charlson Comorbidity Index of 3 (IQR 1-5). 460 (91%) infections were considered healthcare-associated (366 community-onset and 94 hospital-onset), while 44 (9%) were community-associated. 279 (55%) patients had a urinary catheter within the two days prior to the CRE culture. The analysis of patients who progress to an invasive CRE infection, including the results of the univariable and multivariable analyses assessing risk factors for progression is in progress and will be reported in the future. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: In metropolitan Atlanta, the annual incidence of CRE first isolated in urine was estimated to be 1.1 cases per 100,000 population between 2011 and 2017, with the majority of the cases being K. pneumoniae. Most patients had prior healthcare exposure and more than 50% of the patients had a urinary catheter. Our anticipated results will identify risk factors associated with progression from CRE bacteriuria to an invasive infection with a specific focus on having a urinary catheter, as this is a potentially modifiable characteristic that could be a target of future interventions.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

3167 Evaluation of risk factors for progression from carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bacteriuria to an invasive infection

  • Jessica Howard-Anderson (a1), Rebekah Blakney (a2), Christopher Bower (a1), Mary Elizabeth Sexton (a1), Sarah W. Satola (a1), Monica M. Farley (a1) and Jesse T. Jacob (a1)...

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