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3158 Sunitinib-Induced Cardiotoxicity in an Engineered Cardiac Microtissue Model

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 March 2019

Carissa Livingston
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Abhinay Ramachandran
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Elise Corbin
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Alexia Vite
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Alexander Bennett
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Kenneth Margulies
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
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Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: The aims of this study are threefold. Firstly, we are examining the effects of increased in vitro afterload (a proxy for hypertension) on human induced pluripotent stem cell cardiomyocyte (hiPSC-CM) response to sunitinib in a durable and dynamic cardiac microtissue culture system. Secondly, we are exploring effects of repeat exposure and recovery of both sunitinib and afterload throughout the lifetime of the hiPSC-CM microtissue. Finally, we are assessing methods to prevent and treat sunitinib induced cardiotoxicity. Primary outcomes for this study are commonly utilized metrics of cardiotoxicity: degree of caspase activation, electrophysiology benchmarks for minimum voltage threshold and maximum capture rate, and microtissue force generation. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: HiPSC-CMs are cultured and matured as 3D cardiac microtissues (CMTs) on a microtissue array. After maturation, cells are exposed to sunitinib doses of 0µM, 0.5µM, 1µM or 5µM for 12 hours. Concurrently with sunitinib dosing, increases in microtissue array stiffness are created with application of an external magnetic field. Afterload spring constants are fixed at pre-determined physiologic values ranging from 0.5µN/µm, to 5µN/µm. For Aim 1: Half of the CMTs are harvested at 8 hours after sunitinib dosing to conduct the caspase 3/7 assay, and the remainder are examined for 3 days following drug exposure to track temporal changes in electrophysiology and force generation. For Aim 2: After CMT maturation, 12-hour exposures to sunitinib are repeated three times at a fixed dose, with doses separated by one week. Concurrently with sunitinib dosing, increases or decreases in microtissue stiffness are created by changing the strength of an applied external magnetic field to create “ramp up” or “ramp down” stiffness conditions. Caspase assay and contractility metrics are measured at each timepoint. For Aim 3: Experimental conditions are conducted as described in Aim 1. Prior to the introduction of sunitinib, either carvedilol or an AMP-kinase activator is added to the CMT culture media at physiologic concentrations. Primary outcomes are examined as in Aim 1. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Aim 1: We hypothesize that increases in microtissue afterload, synchronized with sunitinib exposure will augment sunitinib toxicity in cardiomyocytes resulting in elevations of caspase 3/7 activity and minimum voltage capture as well as decreases in maximum capture rate and maximum force generation. Aim 2: We hypothesize that repeat exposures to both sunitinib and to increases in afterload will augment sunitinib toxicity in CMTs via the primary outcomes mentioned in Aim 1. Additionally, we hypothesize that decreases in afterload will decrease effective sunitinib toxicity in CMTs via the primary outcomes mentioned in Aim 1. Aim 3: We hypothesize that exposure to an AMP-kinase activator but not carvedilol will decrease the effects of sunitinib toxicity in CMTs via the primary outcomes mentioned in Aim 1. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: The use of small molecule, targeted chemotherapeutic agents is increasingly common. Many of these agents cause cardiotoxic side effects, the mechanisms of which are incompletely understood. Our lab has developed a novel 3D tissue engineering platform capable of supporting durable in vitro cardiac microtissues that experience dynamic alterations in their biomechanical load. By using this platform to examine the cardiotoxic effects of sunitinib, insight into treatment and prevention of this common problem will be developed.

Type
Mechanistic Basic to Clinical
Creative Commons
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2019

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