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3113 Formative Evaluation of a Safety Baby Shower Intervention for Rural African American Parents and Community Advisors

  • Rosemary Nabaweesi (a1), Mary Aitken (a1), Samantha H. Mullins (a1), Keneshia Bryant-Moore (a1), Geoffrey M. Curran (a1) and Zenobia Harris (a1)...

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: To explore rural African American parents’ and their community advisors’ perspectives on the Safety Baby Shower’s acceptability, feasibility, and adaptability. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Collaborating with a local community organization, we explored community advisors’ and expectant women’s SBS experiences to understand intervention delivery and adoption in a rural underserved community (RUC). The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research guided our data collection and analysis using focus groups and key informant interviews. We used directed content analysis to generate themes and sub codes. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Five focus groups (21 participants) and one key informant interview were conducted. Identified barriers that hinder feasibility and acceptability included resources, time/ flexibility, intervention location, cultural norms and beliefs, and the lack of a birthing hospital in the county. “Baby proofing”, “reinforcement products” and “teaching sleep safety on the same day as infant clinical appointment” are expectant mothers’ exemplars for what comes to their minds when asked to think about safety baby showers. To improve feasibility, both community advisors and expectant mothers suggested adaptations ranging from decentralizing or rotating intervention location, using different delivery sites such as churches, scheduling intervention outside business hours, to incorporating intervention into school health fairs and barbeque events. Social media emerged as a facilitator, and integrating safe sleep education into personal baby showers emerged as an implementation strategy. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: The community advisors and expectant mothers identified a wide spectrum of potential adaptations that have potential to improve safe sleep knowledge and practices. In the next study phase, identified themes will inform intervention adaptation and suggested implementation strategies will support uptake of the adapted SBS. Identifying transformative implementation strategies and conducting a community-informed SBS adaptation using a collective decision-making process between intervention experts and local community partners will support improved safety baby shower delivery, adoption and sustainability in RUCs.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

3113 Formative Evaluation of a Safety Baby Shower Intervention for Rural African American Parents and Community Advisors

  • Rosemary Nabaweesi (a1), Mary Aitken (a1), Samantha H. Mullins (a1), Keneshia Bryant-Moore (a1), Geoffrey M. Curran (a1) and Zenobia Harris (a1)...

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