Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

2530 Relationship between preexisting pain and completion of a community-based wellness program

  • Chantay Young (a1) (a2), Sifang Zhao (a1) (a2), Tash Weddle (a1), Sarah Jones (a2), Digna Velez-Edwards (a1) (a2) and Katherine Hartmann (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: New Beginnings is a 12-week community-based behavioral intervention for improving health, strength, and wellness through a holistic approach to coaching that supports lifestyle change. The program serves predominantly low-income, minority women. Given the substantial focus on exercise, including resistance training, we aimed to test whether pain at baseline is associated with program completion in a prospective cohort. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: At the entry of the New Beginnings program, women completed a survey that included a body map of sites at which they experienced pain for most days in the prior week. Using logistic regression, we independently tested the association between presence of pain, the total number of pain sites, and grouped location of pain with program completion, assessing the following a priori candidate confounders: age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and income. We also tested for interaction of pain and age in influencing completion. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Seventy-five percent of participants, 185 of 247, completed the program. They had an average age of 44.2±11.7 years, weight of 244.5±115.4 pounds, and BMI of 41.3±18.2. Fifty-seven percent were African American and 3% were Hispanic. The majority reported preexisting pain (83%), with an average of 3.4±2.7 pain sites. Completers and non-completers did not differ by the total number of pain sites (p=0.2). Having preexisting pain compared to no pain [odds ratio (OR)=1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5–3.4] and to the number of pain sites (OR=1.0; 95% CI: 0.9–1.1) did not influence program completion after adjusting for the sole confounder, which was age. Likewise, we observed no association between limb/joint pain (OR=1.1; 95% CI: 0.6–2.1) or back pain (OR=0.9; 95% CI: 0.5–1.6) with program completion. The association of pain with completion was not modified by age. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: While pain is believed to be a barrier to improving fitness, preexisting pain may not be a strong predictor of completing a holistic lifestyle intervention with a substantial exercise component. Rather, women’s commitment to making a healthy lifestyle change may result in program completion irrespective of preexisting pain. Addressing and accommodating pain-related modifications to exercise interventions promise to be more effective than excluding those with pain from participation.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      2530 Relationship between preexisting pain and completion of a community-based wellness program
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      2530 Relationship between preexisting pain and completion of a community-based wellness program
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      2530 Relationship between preexisting pain and completion of a community-based wellness program
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed