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2264 Early findings from a real-world RCT: Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for persistent pain in an integrated primary care setting

  • Kathryn E. Kanzler (a1) (a2), Patricia Robinson (a1) (a2), Mariana Munante (a1) (a2), Donald McGeary (a1) (a2), Jennifer Potter (a1) (a2), Eliot Lopez (a1) (a2), Jim Mintz (a1) (a2), Lisa Kilpela (a1) (a2), Willie Hale (a1), Donald Dougherty (a2) and Dawn Velligan (a2)...

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: This study seeks to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a brief Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) treatment for patients with persistent pain in a patient-centered medical home. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Participants are recruited via secure messaging, clinic advertisements and clinician referral. Primary care patients age 18 and older with at least 1 pain condition for 12 weeks or more in duration are stratified based on pain severity ratings and randomized into (a) ACT intervention or (b) control group [Enhanced Treatment as Usual (E-TAU)]. Participants in the ACT arm attend 1 individual visit with an integrated behavioral health provider, followed by 3 weekly ACT classes and a booster class 2 months later. E-TAU participants will receive usual care plus patient education handouts informed by cognitive behavioral science. Currently, 17% of our overall goal of 60 patients have completed ACT or enhanced treatment as usual. Average participant age is 49 years old, 70% female, and 70% Hispanic/Latino. Most report multisite pain conditions (e.g., musculoskeletal, fibromyalgia) and 30% are taking opioid medications. Data analysis in this presentation will include early correlational findings from baseline assessments. Upon study completion, we will analyze data using a general linear mixed regression model with repeated measures. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: The overall hypothesis is that brief ACT treatment reduces physical disability in patients with persistent pain when delivered by an integrated behavioral health provider in primary care. By examining a subset of patients on opioid medications, we also anticipate a reduction in opioid misuse behaviors. Additionally, it is anticipated that improvements in patient functioning will be mediated by patient change in pain acceptance and patient engagement in values-consistent behaviors. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: This pilot study will establish preliminary data about the feasibility and effectiveness of addressing persistent pain in a generalizable, “real-world” integrated primary care setting. Data will help support a larger trial in the future. If effective, findings could improve treatment methods and quality of life for patients with persistent pain using a scalable approach.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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