Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

2249: Gene expression signatures of acute respiratory syncytial virus infection in pediatric patients reveals insight into clinical pathogenesis

  • Darrell Dinwiddie, Walter Dehority, Kurt C. Schwalm, Raymond J. Langley, Stephen A. Young and Joshua L. Kennedy...

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: Respiratory viruses cause enormous medical burden, yet many of the specific virus and host genetic factors that impact pathogenesis are still largely unknown or poorly understood. To better understand the drivers of both acute clinical pathogenesis and long-term impacts, such as the development of asthma, we investigated the host response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in pediatric patients. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: We collected nasopharyngeal swabs from 32 pediatric patients with acute RSV infection. The swabs represented a mixed cell population including epithelial and immune cells at the active site of infection. Unbiased RNA sequencing with ribosomal RNA depletion allowed the simultaneous detection of host gene expression and RSV infection. We sequenced samples 2×75 bp on an Illumina NextSeq 500. Sequences were mapped to the human genome using the TopHat 2 aligner and FPKM estimation of reference genes and transcripts and assembly of novel transcripts were conducted with Cufflinks 2. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: During acute RSV infection we identified 7343 genes that were significantly expressed. Pathway analysis using KEGG revealed significant upregulation of pathways involved in innate immune response infection, ribosome function, oxidative phosphorylation, spliceosome and autoimmune disorders. We found high levels of innate immune response genes including CXCL8, IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, IL1RN, and ISG15. In comparing RSV subtype A to RSV B we found significant differential expression of multiple noncoding RNAs. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: Examination of the host gene response during acute RSV infections, yielded important insight into the mechanisms that cause clinical pathogenesis and may provide understanding of the mechanisms that lead to known long-term impacts, such as the development of asthma. Together, this data may be used to guide clinical treatment and management decisions for children with severe RSV infections.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      2249
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      2249
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      2249
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

2249: Gene expression signatures of acute respiratory syncytial virus infection in pediatric patients reveals insight into clinical pathogenesis

  • Darrell Dinwiddie, Walter Dehority, Kurt C. Schwalm, Raymond J. Langley, Stephen A. Young and Joshua L. Kennedy...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed