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portabam, portabas, portabat: Revolutionising Rote-learning by Utilising Sound and Movement to Introduce the Imperfect and Perfect Tenses

  • Lottie Mortimer (a1)

Extract

Latin teaching is stereotypically associated with rote-learning or as Mount (Amo, Amas, Amat … And All That, 2006, p. 13) summarises the experience: ‘learning dreary declensions and conjugations’. When I tell people that I am training to teach Latin, the most common response that I get in reply is something along the lines of ‘Oh, I did Latin in school…I wasn't very good at it… but I can still remember –bo, -bis, -bit…’ and they continue to conjugate in front of me. For many people their only memory of Latin is a joyless experience of grammar by rote, inspiring such rhymes as the one above. Although currently pedagogically unfashionable, there must be some value in rote-learning if people can still recite grammatical paradigms decades later. Inspired by this, I wanted to explore rote-learning in the modern classroom by utilising current research on methods of teaching Latin in the primary sector. Primary Latin teaching often includes sound and movement to engage learners, whilst retaining a heavy emphasis on grammar. I wanted to explore whether such techniques would work at secondary level.

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portabam, portabas, portabat: Revolutionising Rote-learning by Utilising Sound and Movement to Introduce the Imperfect and Perfect Tenses

  • Lottie Mortimer (a1)

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