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‘Not so Much Learning to Speak Latin, but Speaking to Learn it’. Action Research on the Use of Conversational, Spoken Latin in the UK Secondary School Classroom.

  • James Sinclair

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I undertook research into the use of conversational, spoken Latin in the UK classroom, due to my intention to answer three specific research questions. Firstly, I wanted to find out how easy it is for the contemporary Classics teacher to implement communicative approaches to the teaching of Latin. Secondly, I wished to discover what techniques the Classics teacher can adopt to implement communicative approaches to the teaching of Latin, within the framework of active, oral communication in Latin. Thirdly, I wanted to consider how positive is the attitude of students engaging with communicative approaches to the teaching of Latin. I was introduced to this area of research on my PGCE course of study at Cambridge University. Furthermore, I was especially inspired by the scholarship of Coffee (2012), King (2011), Lloyd (2016), Patrick (2015), Rasmussen (2015) and Tunberg (2011) who have written so positively about the unique ability of communicative approaches to unlock the joy of experiencing and employing the Latin language for individuals of all ages.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

References

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Cambridge Schools Classics Project. (1998). Cambridge Latin Course, Book 2, Fourth Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Coffee, N. (2012). Active Latin: Quo tendimus? Classical World, 105 (2), pp. 255269
King, J. (2011). Latin speaking camps. Journal of Classics Teaching, 22, p. 12.
Lloyd, M. (2016) Living Latin: An Interview with Professor Terence Tunberg. Journal of Classics Teaching, 17 (34), pp. 4448.
Patrick, R. (2015). Making Sense of Comprehensible Input in the Latin Classroom. Teaching Classical Languages, 6 (1), pp. 108136.
Rasmussen, S. (2015). Why Oral Latin? Teaching Classical Languages, 6.1, pp. 3745.
Tunberg, T. (2011). The use of Latin as a spoken language in the Humanist Age. Journal of Classics Teaching, 22, p. 89.

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‘Not so Much Learning to Speak Latin, but Speaking to Learn it’. Action Research on the Use of Conversational, Spoken Latin in the UK Secondary School Classroom.

  • James Sinclair

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