Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Editorial
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Editorial
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Editorial
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Abstract

It is again my pleasure to work with an outstanding group of contributors in the production of this, the 10th Annual Research Review. As always our goal is to solicit reviews from authorities in the field, which will serve to update the readership on aspects of current research and emerging research trends. Authors are encouraged to be selective, rather than comprehensive, in coverage and to focus on the aspects of research they feel are most important. In addition to thanking the authors, I am also grateful to the various referees who provided thoughtful and detailed commentary to the authors, which has enriched the papers further. As noted in last year's editorial, we are now beginning to return to topics covered in previous reviews.

It is a particular pleasure to have Professor Rutter and colleagues provide an update of his earlier (1990) review of genetics and child psychiatry. The first of their two papers provides a summary of advances in quantitative psychiatric genetics with particular attention to both conceptual and methodological advances. Important shifts in research strategies are noted. In the second paper Rutter and colleagues focus more specifically on advances relative to specific disorders. It is clear that work in this area is likely to advance our knowledge substantially in the years ahead in ways that we can now only begin to appreciate. Angold, Costello, and Erkanli have provided a very helpful review of the topic of comorbidity in the psychiatric disorders of childhood adolescence. This is an area of some controversy and their review provides a valuable summary of current knowledge. Stevenson addresses issues in the treatment of the long-term sequelae of child abuse; he notes that while considerable progress has been made, important questions regarding treatment and prevention remain to be answered. Filipek reviews the current state of knowledge on neuroimaging in the developmental disorders. Advances in the field have given us the opportunity to understand fundamental aspects of brain-behavior relationships. Finally, Hetherington and Stanley-Hagan review current knowledge regarding the effects of divorce on children; this topic is an increasingly important one in terms of both research and intervention.

For the 11th edition of the Annual Research Review we anticipate that topics covered will include language acquisition, substance abuse, intersubjectivity, child abuse, effects of HIV infection on children, and advances in psychological assessment methods.