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Do children go for the nice guys? The influence of speaker benevolence and certainty on selective word learning

  • Myrthe BERGSTRA (a1), Hannah N. M. DE MULDER (a2) and Peter COOPMANS (a3)

Abstract

This study investigated how speaker certainty (a rational cue) and speaker benevolence (an emotional cue) influence children's willingness to learn words in a selective learning paradigm. In two experiments four- to six-year-olds learnt novel labels from two speakers and, after a week, their memory for these labels was reassessed. Results demonstrated that children retained the label–object pairings for at least a week. Furthermore, children preferred to learn from certain over uncertain speakers, but they had no significant preference for nice over nasty speakers. When the cues were combined, children followed certain speakers, even if they were nasty. However, children did prefer to learn from nice and certain speakers over nasty and certain speakers. These results suggest that rational cues regarding a speaker's linguistic competence trump emotional cues regarding a speaker's affective status in word learning. However, emotional cues were found to have a subtle influence on this process.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author. Trans 10, 3512 JK Utrecht, The Netherlands. E-mail: M.Bergstra@uu.nl

Footnotes

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**

Bergstra and De Mulder share first authorship of this paper.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Do children go for the nice guys? The influence of speaker benevolence and certainty on selective word learning

  • Myrthe BERGSTRA (a1), Hannah N. M. DE MULDER (a2) and Peter COOPMANS (a3)

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