Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-77ffc5d9c7-n2wdk Total loading time: 0.365 Render date: 2021-04-23T03:43:44.899Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Playing with pronouns in French maternal speech to prelingual infants*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2009

Jacqueline Rabain-Jamin
Affiliation:
Université Paris V Sorbonne, Centre national de la recherche scientifique
Emilie Sabeau-Jouannet
Affiliation:
Université Paris V Sorbonne, Centre national de la recherche scientifique

Abstract

Conventional and displaced uses of pronouns in maternal speech to refer to the baby were investigated in a developmental study of six mother—infant dyads using video-recordings of their free play at three, seven and ten months. These pronominal uses were analysed in a number of semantic contexts to determine how interactive situations influence the use of different types of pronouns. Results show that third- and first-person pronouns occur significantly more often in the semantic context of affect-oriented activities than in the semantic context of goal-directed activities. For second-person pronouns the results are the opposite. The contrast found between these two contexts, i.e. where the child is presented as the agent of a meaningful activity or not, shows how the place constructed for the baby as an interlocutor in maternal speech evolves with age. This study underlines the part the third person plays with its descriptive value in the acquisition of the system of pronouns.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1989

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Footnotes

*

The authors would like to thank H. Feider, P. M. Greenfield, E. Ortigues and A. Streri for their comments on the manuscript. Special thanks are extended to the staff of the Hôpital Notre Dame du Bon Secours (Paris 14e) and the Essone district mother and child care centre (PMI).

References

Bateson, M. C. (1975). Mother-infant exchanges: the epigenesis of conversational interaction. In Aaronson, D. & Rieber, R. W. (eds), Developmental psycholinguistics and communication disorders. New York: New York Academy of Sciences.Google Scholar
Benveniste, E. (1966). Problèmes de linguistique générale. Paris: Gallimard.Google Scholar
Boutet, J. (1986). La référence à la personne en français parlé: le cas du on. Langage et Société 38. 1950.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, R. & Bellugi, U. (1964). Three processes in the child's acquisition of syntax. Harvard Educational Review 34. 133–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bruner, J. S. (1975). From communication to language: a psychological perspective. Cognition 3. 255–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Castoriadis-Aulagnier, P. (1975). La violence de l'interprétation. Paris: P.U.F.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Charney, R. (1980). Speech roles and the development of personal pronouns. Journal of Child Language 7. 509–28.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cross, T. G. (1977). Mothers' speech adjustments: the contribution of selected child listener variables. In Snow, C. E. & Ferguson, C. A. (eds), Talking to children: language input and acquisition. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar
Deleau, M. (1985). De l'interaction à la communication non verbale. In Noizet, G., Bélanger, D. & Bresson, F. (eds), La communication. Paris: P.U.F.Google Scholar
Ferguson, C. A. (1964). Baby talk in six languages. American Anthropologist 66. 103–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernald, A. (1984). The perceptual and affective salience of mothers' speech to infants. In Feagans, L., Garvey, C. & Golinkoff, R. (eds), The origins and growth of communication. Norwood NJ: Ablex.Google Scholar
Field, T. M., Woodson, R., Greenberg, D. & Cohen, D. (1982). Discrimination and imitation of facial expressions by neonates. Science 218. 179–81.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fontanier, P. (1968). Les figures du discours. Paris: Flammarion.Google Scholar
Freud, S. (1920). Beyond the pleasure principle. In Strachey, J. (ed.), Freud. Standard Edition. Vol. 18. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
Gardiner, A. (1954). The theory of proper names. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Garnica, O. K. (1977). Some prosodic and paralinguistic features of speech to young children. In Snow, C. E. & Ferguson, C. A. (eds), Talking to children: language input and acquisition. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar
Granger, G. (1982). A quoi servent les noms propres? Langages 66. 2136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grégoire, A. (1937). L'apprentissage du langage: les deux premières années. Paris: Droz.Google Scholar
Josse, M. & Robin, M. (1983). A propos du contenu du langage maternel. La Psychiatrie de l'Enfant 26. 99140.Google Scholar
Kaye, K. (1980). Why we don't talk ‘baby talk’ to babies. Journal of Child Language 7. 489507.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kaye, K. (1982). The mental and social life of babies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Kerbrat-Orecchioni, C. (1980). L'énunciation de la subjectivité dans le langage. Paris: Colin.Google Scholar
Leopold, W. F. (1939). Speech development of a bilingual child: a linguist's record. Vol. 1. New York: AMS Press.Google Scholar
Maingueneau, D. (1981). Approche de l'énonciation en linguistique française. Paris: Hachette.Google Scholar
Meltzoff, A. N. & Moore, M. K. (1977). Imitation of facial and manual gestures by human neonates. Science 198. 75–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Molino, J. (1982). Le nom propre dans la langue. Langages 66. 520.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Murphy, C. M. & Messer, D. J. (1977). Mothers, infants and pointing: a study of a gesture. In Schaffer, H. R. (ed), Studies of mother-infant interaction. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Ortigues, E. (1977). Identité et personnalité. Dialogue 16. 605–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Papousek, M. & Papousek, H. (1981). Musical elements in the infant's vocalizations: their significance for communication, cognition and creativity. In Lipsitt, L. (ed.), Advances in infancy research. Vol. 1. New Brunswick NJ: Ablex.Google Scholar
Penman, R., Cross, T., Milgrom-Friedman, J. & Meares, R. (1983). Mothers' speech to prelingual infants: a pragmatic analysis. Journal of Child Language 10. 1734.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Phillips, J. R. (1973). Syntax and vocabulary of mothers' speech to young children: age and sex comparisons. Child Development 44. 182–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Piaget, J. (1945). La formation du symbole chez l'enfant. Neuchâtel: Delachaux et Niestlé.Google Scholar
Piñol-Douriez, M. (1984). Bébé agi. Bébé actif. L'émergence du symbole dans l'économie interactionnelle. Paris: P.U.F.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rabain-Jamin, J. (1984 a). Survey of the infant's ‘sound envelope’ and organization of parent-infant communication. In Call, J. D., Galenson, E. & Tyson, R. L. (eds), Frontiers of infant psychiatry. Vol. II. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Rabain-Jamin, J. (1984 b). De quelques formes paradoxales de l'échange mère-nourrisson. Neuropsychiatrie de l'Enfance 32. 545–51.Google Scholar
Rondal, J. A. (1983). L'interaction adulte-enfant et la construction du langage. Bruxelles: Mardaga.Google Scholar
Russell, B. (1940). An inquiry into meaning and truth. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
Ryan, J. (1974). Early language development. In Richards, M. P. M. (ed.), The integration of the child into a social world. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar
Sabeau-Jouannet, E. (1975). Les premières acquisitions syntaxiques chez des enfants français unilingues. La Linguistique 11. 105–22.Google Scholar
Sacks, H., Schegloff, E. & Jefferson, G. (1974). A simplest systematics for the organization of turn-taking for conversation. Language 50. 696735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Savić, S. (1975). Aspects of adult-child communication: the problem of question acquisition. Journal of Child Language 2. 251–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sherrod, K. B., Crawley, S., Petersen, G. & Bennett, P. (1978). Maternal language to prelinguistic infants: semantic aspects. Infant Behavior and Development 1. 335–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Siguan Soler, M. (1977). De la communication au langage verbal. In Bronckart, J. P. & Malrieu, P. (eds), La genèse de la parole. Paris: P.U.F.Google Scholar
Snow, C. E. (1972). Mothers' speech to children learning language. Child Development 43. 549–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snow, C. E. (1977). The development of conversation between mothers and babies. Journal of Child Language 4. 122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stern, D. N., Spieker, S. & MacKain, K. (1982). Intonation contours as signals in maternal speech to prelinguistic infants. Developmental Psychology 18. 727–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stern, D. N., Spieker, S., Barnett, R. K. & MacKain, K. (1983). The prosody of maternal speech: infant age and context-related changes. Journal of Child Language 10. 115.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tabouret-Keller, A. (1966). A propos de l'acquisition du langage. Bulletin de Psychologie 19. 437–51.Google Scholar
Trevarthen, C. (1977). Descriptive analyses of infant communicative behaviour. In Schaffen, H. R. (ed.), Studies in mother–infant interaction. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Trevarthen, C. & Hubley, P. (1978). Secondary intersubjectivity. In Lock, A. (ed.), Action, gesture and symbol: the emergence of language. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Weir, R. H. (1962). Language in the crib. The Hague: Mouton.Google Scholar
Wills, D. D. (1977). Participant deixis in English and baby-talk. In Snow, C. E. & Ferguson, C. A. (eds), Talking to children: language input and acquisition. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 40 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Playing with pronouns in French maternal speech to prelingual infants*
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Playing with pronouns in French maternal speech to prelingual infants*
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Playing with pronouns in French maternal speech to prelingual infants*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *