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On the existence of competence errors in early comprehension: a reply to Fremgen & Fay and Chapman & Thomson*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2008

Carolyn B. Mervis
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Katherine Canada
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Abstract

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Type
Notes and Discussion
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1983

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Footnotes

[*]

We would like to thank Patricia Christensen and Cindy Mervis for their assistance with this research. Margie Beeghly-Smith, Doug Medin, John Pani and Mort Weir provided helpful comments on a previous draft of this manuscript. We are especially grateful to Becky, Cars and Jessica and their mothers for their enthusiastic participation in this project. This research was supported by grant no. BNS 79-15120 from the National Science Foundation. Address for correspondence: Carolyn Mervis, Department of Psychology, Tobin Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 01003.

References

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