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The development of phonological memory and language: A multiple groups approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2020


Audrey DELCENSERIE
Affiliation:
Université de Montréal, Department of Psychology, Canada Université de Montréal, École d'orthophonie et d'audiologie, Canada
Fred GENESEE
Affiliation:
McGill University, Department of Psychology, Canada
Natacha TRUDEAU
Affiliation:
Université de Montréal, École d'orthophonie et d'audiologie, Canada
François CHAMPOUX
Affiliation:
Université de Montréal, École d'orthophonie et d'audiologie, Canada
Corresponding

Abstract

Pierce et al. (2017) have proposed that variations in the timing, quality and quantity of language input during the earliest stages of development are related to variations in the development of phonological working memory and, in turn, to later language learning outcomes. To examine this hypothesis, three groups of children who are at-risk for language learning were examined: children with cochlear implants (CI), children with developmental language disorder (DLD), and internationally-adopted (IA) children, Comparison groups of typically-developing monolingual (MON) children and second language (L2) learners were also included. All groups were acquiring French as a first or second language and were matched on age, gender, and socioeconomic status, as well as other group-specific factors; they were between 5;0–7;3 years of age at time of testing. The CI and DLD groups scored significantly more poorly on the memory measures than the other groups; while the IA and L2 groups did not differ from one another. While the IA group performed more poorly than the MON group, there was no difference between the L2 and MON groups. We also found differential developmental relationships between phonological memory and language among the groups of interest in comparison to the typically-developing MON and L2 groups supporting the hypothesis that language experiences early in life are consequential for language development because of their effects on the development of phonological memory.


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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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