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INTELLIGENCE IN TAIWAN: PROGRESSIVE MATRICES MEANS AND SEX DIFFERENCES IN MEANS AND VARIANCES FOR 6- TO 17-YEAR-OLDS

  • RICHARD LYNN (a1), HSIN-YI CHEN (a2) and YUNG-HUA CHEN (a3)

Summary

Data for Raven's Progressive Matrices are reported for a sample of 6290 6- to 17-year-olds in Taiwan. The Taiwanese obtained a mean IQ of 109.5, in relation to a British mean of 100. There was no difference in mean scores of boys and girls at age 7 years. At age 10 years girls obtained significantly higher scores than boys, and at ages 13 and 16 years boys obtained significantly higher scores than girls. There was no sex difference in variance at age 7 years. At ages 10, 13 and 16 years variance was significantly greater in boys.

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INTELLIGENCE IN TAIWAN: PROGRESSIVE MATRICES MEANS AND SEX DIFFERENCES IN MEANS AND VARIANCES FOR 6- TO 17-YEAR-OLDS

  • RICHARD LYNN (a1), HSIN-YI CHEN (a2) and YUNG-HUA CHEN (a3)

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