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Voluntary sterilisation among Canadian women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Margaret De Wit
Affiliation:
Population Studies Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
Fernando Rajulton
Affiliation:
Population Studies Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Summary

Using data from the 1984 Canadian Fertility Survey, proportional hazards modelling was employed to determine factors associated with the likelihood of voluntary sterilisation among 5315 women of childbearing age, and the trends in timing and differences in the likelihood associated with different age cohorts. Multivariate analysis suggests that educational attainment, parity and duration since last birth at the time of sterilisation, religious commitment, province of residence and marital status at the time of sterilisation, are all important predictors. Education and parity attainment emerged as the best predictors of the timing of voluntary sterilisation in all age cohorts, but the contribution of other covariates varies between cohorts.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1991

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References

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