Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-kl86h Total loading time: 2.187 Render date: 2021-04-12T07:35:26.815Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Education, fertility and contraception among Hindus and Roman Catholics in Goa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

T. K. Roy
Affiliation:
International Institute for Population Sciences, Bombay, India
G. Rama Rao
Affiliation:
International Institute for Population Sciences, Bombay, India
Rajiva Prasad
Affiliation:
International Institute for Population Sciences, Bombay, India

Summary

Differences in age at marriage, fertility and contraceptive use are related to religious background, individual educational level and community level education. In general, the effects of community education are weak compared to individual level of education, but differences exist between Hindus and Roman Catholics.

Type
Short Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1991

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bongaarts, J. (1978) A framework for analysing the proximate determinants of fertility. Popul. Dev. Rev. 4, 105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Casterline, J. (1981) Community effects on individual demographic behaviour: multilevel analysis of WFS data. In: International Population Conference, Manila, Vol. 5, p. 405. IUSSP, Liège.Google Scholar
Davis, K. & Blake, J. (1956) Social structure and fertility: an analytic framework. Econ. Dev. cult. Change, 4, 211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Entwisle, B., Mason, W. M. & Hermalin, A. I. (1986) The multilevel dependence of contraceptive use on socioeconomic development and family planning program strength. Demography, 23, 199.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Freedman, R. (1974) Community Level Data in Fertility Surveys. World Fertility Survey Occasional Papers No. 8. International Statistical Institute, Voorburg, Netherlands.Google Scholar
Hermalin, A. I. & Mason, W. M. (1980) A strategy for the comparative analysis of WFS data, with illustrative examples. In: UN Programme for Comparative Analysis of World Fertility Survey Data. UNFPA, New York.Google Scholar
Hobcraft, J. (1982) Strategies for comparative analysis of WFS data. In: World Fertility Conference, 1980: A Record of the Proceedings. International Statistical Institute, Voorburg, Netherlands.Google Scholar
Lesthaeghe, R., Vanderhoeft, C, Becker, S. & Kibet, M. (1985) Individual and contextual effects of education on proximate fertility determinants and on life-time fertility in Kenya. In: The Collection and Analysis of Community Data. Edited by Casterline, J. B.. International Statistical Institute, Voorburg, Netherlands.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 25 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 12th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Education, fertility and contraception among Hindus and Roman Catholics in Goa
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Education, fertility and contraception among Hindus and Roman Catholics in Goa
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Education, fertility and contraception among Hindus and Roman Catholics in Goa
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *