Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-6pznq Total loading time: 0.243 Render date: 2021-03-08T13:44:22.385Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Differential fertility in the United States, 1980: continuity or change?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Howard Wineberg
Affiliation:
Department of Population Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA
James McCarthy
Affiliation:
Department of Population Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA

Summary

This paper considers how changes in women's socio-cultural characteristics have influenced recent patterns of differential fertility in the United States and whether the convergence of fertility differentials observed up to 1970 has continued. Analysis of data from the June 1980 United States Current Population Survey, suggests that there has been no change in differential fertility in recent years. Age at first birth, length of first birth interval, income and education were all negatively associated with fertility, among both older and younger women. When fertility expectations were examined, however, the association of the independent variables with expected completed fertility was weaker among younger women, indicating that there has been some convergence in expected completed fertility. Further narrowing of differentials in actual fertility depends on how successful the younger women are in preventing future unplanned births.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Anderson, J.E. (1981) Planning status of marital births, 1975–1976. Fam. Plann. Perspect. 13, 62.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bachrach, C.A. (1984) Contraceptive practice among American women, 1973–1982. Fam. Plann. Perspect. 16, 253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lauriat, P. (1969) The effect of marital dissolution on fertility. J. Marr. & Fam. 31, 484.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
National Center for Health Statistics (1981) Interval Between Births: United States, 1970–77. By Spratley, E. & Taffel, S., Vital and Health Statistics, Series 21, No. 39. Public Health Service, Hyattsville, Md.Google ScholarPubMed
National Center for Health Statistics (1982) Advance Report of Final Natality Statistics, 1980. Monthly Vital Statistics Report, Vol. 31, No. 8, Supplement. Public Health Services, Hyattsville, Md.Google Scholar
Pebley, A.R. (1981) Changing attitudes toward the timing of first births. Fam. Plann. Perspect. 13, 171.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thornton, A. (1978) Marital dissolution, remarriage, and childbearing. Demography, 15, 361.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Trussell, J. & Menken, J. (1978) Early childbearing and subsequent fertility. Fam. Plann. Perspect 10, 209.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
US Bureau of the Census (1978) The Current Population Survey: Design and Methodology. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
US Bureau of the Census (1981a) Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1980. Current Population Reports, Population Characteristics, Series P-20, No. 365. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
US Bureau of the Census (1981b) Current Population Survey, June 1980: Tape Technical Documentation. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
US Bureau of the Census (1983) Lifetime Earnings Estimates for Men and Women in the United States: 1979. Current Population Reports, Consumer Income, Series P-60, No. 139. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
US Bureau of the Census (1984) 1980 Census of Population, Vol. 1, Characteristics of the Population. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
Westoff, C.F. & Ryder, N.B. (1977) The Contraceptive Revolution. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 14 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 8th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Differential fertility in the United States, 1980: continuity or change?
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Differential fertility in the United States, 1980: continuity or change?
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Differential fertility in the United States, 1980: continuity or change?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *