Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 March 2010

Extract

The first part of this project was published in the February 1995 issue of this journal, with the title “Early Religious Traditions from the Neolithic through the Han (circa. 4000 b.c.e.-220 c.e.).” It included essays by Constance A. Cook, Donald Harper, David N. Keightley and Edward L. Shaughnessy. The introduction to Part I noted the rapid growth of studies of Chinese religious traditions and discussed some of the continuities between earlier and later practices and beliefs. It emphasized the importance of a knowledge of religious activities for our understanding of Chinese culture. Part II continues the story with surveys of recent studies of traditions that are still active today. As was the case for Part I, the present essays are focussed primarily on Western language studies, though some work by Chinese and Japanese scholars is also discussed. The reason for this focus is that this project is intended to introduce this broad field of study to nonspecialists in the West, taking into account recent materials published through 1994.

Type
Chinese ReligionsThe State of the Field, Part II. Living Religious Traditions: Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Islam and Popular Religion
Copyright
Copyright © The Association for Asian Studies, Inc. 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Ahern, Emily M. 1975. “The Power and Pollution of Chinese Women.” In Wolf, Margery and Witke, Roxane, eds., Women in Chinese Society. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Birrell, Anne. 1993. Chinese Mythology: An Introduction. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Black, Alison H. 1986. “Gender and Cosmology in Chinese Correlative Thinking”. In Bynum, Carolyn Walker, Harrell, Stevan and Richman, Paula, eds., Gender and Religion: on the Complexity of Symbols. Boston: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
Bonnefoy, Yves, comp. 1993. Asian Mythologies. Translated under the direction of Wendy Doniger. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press. From the original French edition, Paris 1981.Google Scholar
Boltz, Judith Magee. 1986. “In Homage to Tien-fei.” Journal of the American Oriental Society 106. 1:211232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bryder, Peter. 1985. The Chinese Transformation of Manichaeism: A Study of Chinese Manichaean Terminology. N.p. Bokforlaget.Google Scholar
CabezóN, José Ignacio. 1992. Buddhism, Sexuality and Gender. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Cahill, Suzanne E. 1993. Transcendence and Divine Passion: The Queen Mother of the West in Medieval China. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Cheu, Hock Tong. 1988. The Nine Emperor Gods: A Study of Chinese Spirit-Medium Cults. Singapore: Times Books International.Google Scholar
Ching, Julia. 1993. Chinese Religions. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clammer, John R., ed. 1983- Studies in Chinese Folk Religion in Singapore and Malaysia. Singapore: The Board of Editors, Contributions to Southeast Asian Ethnography.Google Scholar
Dean, Kenneth. 1989. “Taoism in Southern Fujian: Field Notes, Fall, 1985.”In Tsao, Pen-Yen and Law, Daniel P. L., eds., Studies of Taoist Rituals and Music of Today. Hong Kong: Society for Ethnomusicological Research.Google Scholar
Despeux, Catherine. 1986. “L'ordination des Femmes Taoïstes sous les Tang.”Études Chinoises 5:53100.Google Scholar
Ebrey, Patricia Buckley. 1993. The Inner Quarters: Marriage and the Lives of Chinese Women in the Sung Period. Berkeley, Los Angeles, Oxford: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Eliade, Mircea, ed. 1987. The Encyclopedia of Religion, 16 vols. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co.Google Scholar
Feuchtwang, Stephan. 1989. “The Study of Chinese Popular Religion in the PRC.” Cahiers Vilfredo Pareto-Revue Européene des Sciences Sociales 84:6986.Google Scholar
Grant, Beata. 1989. “The Spiritual Saga of Women Huang: From Pollution to Purification.” In Johnson, David, ed., Ritual Opera, Operatic Ritual: “Mulien Rescues His Mother” in Chinese Popular Culture. Berkeley: Chinese Popular Culture Project.Google Scholar
Guisso, Richard W. and Johannesen, Stanley, eds. 1981. Women in China: Current Directions in Historical Scholarship. Youngstown, N.Y.: Philo Press.Google Scholar
Guisso, Richard W. and Johannesen, Stanley. 1981. “Thunder Over the Lake: The Five Classics and the Perception of Women in Early China.” Ine Guisso, and Johannesen, , eds., 1981.Google Scholar
Harrell, Stevan. 1986. “Men, Women and Ghosts in Taiwanese Folk Religion.”In Bynum, Caroline Walker, Harrell, Stevan, and Richman, Paula, eds., Gender and Religion: On the Complexity of Symbols. Boston: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
Ho, Yun-Yi. 1981. The Ministry of Rites and Suburban Sacrifices in the Early Ming. Taipei: Shuang-yeh Book Co.Google Scholar
Jochim, Christian. 1986. Chinese Religion: A Cultural Perspective. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall Inc.Google Scholar
Kelleher, Theresa. 1987. “Confucianism.” In Sharma, Arvind, ed., Women in World Religions. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Kohn, Livia, ed. 1993. The Taoist Experience. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Lee, Raymond L. M. 1983. “Dancing with the Gods: A Spirit Medium Festival in Urban Malaysia.” Anthropos 78.3-4:355368.Google Scholar
Lieu, Samuel N. C. 1985. Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China: A Historical Survey. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
Lin, Mei-Rong, ed. 1991. Taiwan min-chien hsin-yang yen-chiu shu-mu [A bibliography of Taiwanese folk belief]. Taiwan History Field Research Office. Resource and Information Series, No. 3. Taipei: Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica.Google Scholar
Ma, Xisha and Bingfang, Han. 1992. Zhongguo minjian zongjiao shi. [A history of Chinese folk-religion]. Shanghai: Renmin chubanshe.Google Scholar
Macinnis, Donald E. 1989. Religion in China Today: Policy and Practice. Mary knoll: Orbis Books.Google Scholar
Mcmullen, David. 1987. “Bureaucracies and Cosmology: The Ritual Code of T'ang China.” In Cannadine, David and Price, Simon, eds., Rituals of Royalty. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Noguchi, Tetsurō, ed. 1989. “The Bibliography on Ming-Qing Religions: Works on Japanese and Chinese” (sic) (in Japanese). The Shihō, No. 4 (Supplement). Published by the Oriental History Seminar of Tsukuba University.Google Scholar
Overmyer, Daniel L. 1986. Religions of China: The World as a Living System. San Francisco: Harper San Francisco. Revised edition, 1992. In Earhart, H. Byron, ed., Religious Traditions of the World. San Francisco: Harper San Francisco.Google Scholar
Overmyer, Daniel L. 1989–1990. “Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Ritual Texts of the Chinese State: The Collected Statutes of the Great Ming.” Cahiers d'Extrême-Asie 5: 191221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Overmyer, Daniel L. 1991. “Women in Chinese Religions: Submission, Struggle, Transcendence.”In Shinohara, Koichi and Schopen, Gregory, eds., From Benares to Beijing. Essays on Buddhism and Chinese Religion in Honour of Prof. Jan Yün-hua. Oakville: Mosaic Press.Google Scholar
Pas, Julian F. 1989. The Turning of the Tide: Religion in China Today. Hongkong: Hongkong Branch, Royal Asiatic Society, in Association with the Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Paul, Diana. 1979. Women in Buddhism: Images of the Feminine in Mahayana Tradition. Berkeley: Asian Humanities Press.Google Scholar
Robinet, Isabelle. 1988. “Sexualité et taoïsme.” In Dernos, M., ed., Sexualité et Religion. Paris: Le Cerf.Google Scholar
Sangren, P. Steven. 1983. “Female Gender in Chinese Religious Symbols: Kuan Yin, Ma Tsu and the Eternal Mother.” Signs 9. 1: 425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schuster, Nancy. 1985. “Striking a Balance: Women and Images of Women in Early Chinese Buddhism.” In Haddad, Yvonne Yazbek and Findly, Ellison Banks, eds., Women, Religion and Social Change. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Seaman, Gary. 1981. “The Sexual Politics of Karmic Retribution.” In Ahern, Emily Martin and Gates, Hill, eds., The Anthropology of Taiwan Society. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Seymour, James D. and Werhli, Eugen, eds. and trans. 1994. “Religion in China.” Chinese Sociology and Anthropology. Spring, 1994:26. 3 (entire issue).Google Scholar
Sharma, Arvind, ed. Forthcoming. Today's Women in World Religions. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Sommer, Deborah. 1995. Chinese Religion: An Anthology of Sources. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Strickman, Michael. 1974. “Taoism, History of.” Encyclopedia Britannica. 15th edition, 17: 10451055.Google Scholar
Suryadinata, Leo, ed. 1989. The Ethnic Chinese in the ASEAN States: Bibliographical Essays. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.Google Scholar
Tan, Chee-Beng. 1983. “Chinese Religion in Malaysia: A General View.” Asian Folklore Studies 42:217–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tan, Chee-Beng. 1985. The Development and Distribution ofDejiao Associations in Malaysia and Singapore: A Study on a Chinese Religious Organization. Occasional Paper No. 79. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taylor, Romeyn. 1990. “Official and Popular Religion and the Political Organization of Chinese Society in the Ming.” In Liu, Kwang-Ching, ed., Orthodoxy in Late Imperial China. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Thompson, Laurence G. 1989. Chinese Religion: An Introduction. 4th ed. Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing Co.Google Scholar
Thompson, Laurence G. comp. 1993. Seaman, Gary, ed., Chinese Religion: Publications in Western Languages 1981 through 1990. Los Angeles: Ethnographies Press Center for Visual Anthropology, University of Southern California. Published by the Association for Asian Studies.Google Scholar
Topley, Marjorie. 1974. “Cosmic Antagonisms: A Mother Child Syndrome.”In Wolf, Arthur P., ed., Religion and Ritual in Chinese Society. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Tsai, Kathryn A. 1981. “The Chinese Buddhist Monastic Order for Women: The First Two Centuries.” In Guisso, and Johannesen, , eds., 1981.Google Scholar
Tsai, Kathryn A. trans. 1994. The Lives of Nuns. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. This is a translation of the Pi-ch'iu-ni chuan, compiled by Shih Pao-ch'ang in about 516.Google Scholar
Tu, Wei-Ming. 1984. “On Neo-Confucianism and Human Relatedness.” In Devos, George A. and Sofue, Takao, eds., Religion and the Family in East Asia. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Waltner, Ann. 1987. “T'an-yang-tzu and Wang Shih-chen: Visionary and Bureaucrat in the Late Ming.” Late Imperial China 8. 1:105133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Watson, Rubie S. and Ebrey, Patricia Buckley, eds. 1991. Marriage and Inequality in Chinese Society. Berkeley: University-of California Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wee, Viviene. 1976. “‘Buddhism’ in Singapore.” In Hassan, Riaz, ed., Singapore: Society in Transition. Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Wolf, Margery and Witke, Roxane, eds. 1975. Women in Chinese Society. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Yu, David C. comp. 1994. Religion in Postwar China. A Critical Analysis ond Annotated Bibliography. Bibliographies and Indexes in Religious Studies, No. 28. Gorman, G. E. Advisory Editor. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 18 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-898fc554b-87htd Total loading time: 0.373 Render date: 2021-01-25T20:52:32.245Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Introduction
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Introduction
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Introduction
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *